Late Medieval to Early Modern Literature

Kingston University

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Late Medieval to Early Modern Literature

  • Host University

    Kingston University

  • Location

    London, England

  • Area of Study

    Literature

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    Successful completion of introductory level English literature study

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credits

    4
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    0
  • Overview

    Course Content:

    This module provides an introduction to the literary culture of England during the years
    1380-1650. This module considers medieval and early modern English texts in relation to
    influential works from the Continent (mostly from Italy, the ?birthplace of the
    Renaissance?) and by situating canonical literature in relation to non-canonical writings
    of the medieval and early modern periods. You will begin by examining poetry and drama
    written in the late-Medieval period, including some of Chaucer?s Canterbury Tales.

    The rest of the autumn semester will focus on medieval drama ? from mystery plays to
    morality plays ? highlighting continuity and change with later, Renaissance drama. It will
    also study English literature and culture in the fifteenth and early-sixteenth centuries in
    relation to Continental influences. Because Shakespeare?s Richard II is a Renaissance play
    whose action takes place in the medieval period, this play provides a pivotal middle point
    between the autumn and spring semesters.

    The second semester considers the mid-sixteenth century and continues with plays,
    poetry, prose and cultural documents framed on one side by the Edwardian Reformation
    and on the other by the English Civil War.

    AUTUMN SEMESTER LECTURES:
    Introduction and Medieval Lyrics, Breton Lays, Chaucer I, Chaucer II: Representing
    Women, Chaucerian Intertexts, Medieval Drama: Introduction and Mystery Plays,
    Medieval Drama: Mystery Plays, Medieval Drama: Morality Plays I, Morality Plays II,
    Transmitting the Renaissance.

    SPRING SEMESTER LECTURES:
    Envisioning the Renaissance, fashioning a Gentleman, The Humanist Household,
    Petrarchism I, Petrarchism II , Petrarchism III, The Limits of Petrarchism, Women and the
    Religious Lyric, Elizabethan Epyllia, Jacobean Drama and the End of Things, Last Things.

    Teaching:
    Lectures/workshops and seminars

    Assessment:
    STUDY OPTION 1: Portfolio of written exercises:
    1) Two take-home exams, one per semester, each of approximately 1,000 words
    (each 25%)
    2) A 2,000-word Final Essay that considers one or more of the texts studied in the
    module (50%).
    STUDY OPTION 2: portfolio (some elements as those for Study Option 1).
    STUDY OPTION 3: portfolio (some elements as those for Study Option 1).

    Study Option 1 = Whole Year
    Study Option 2 = Autumn
    Study Option 3 = Spring/summer

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Some courses may require additional fees.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.

Please reference fall and spring course lists as not all courses are taught during both semesters.

Please note that some courses with locals have recommended prerequisite courses. It is the student's responsibility to consult any recommended prerequisites prior to enrolling in their course.