Introduction to Social Medicine II

King's College London

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Introduction to Social Medicine II

  • Host University

    King's College London

  • Location

    London, England

  • Area of Study

    Global Health, Public Health

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • UK Credits

    15
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Module description: Our introductory modules on social medicine introduce students to the changing nature of modern medicine in Europe and the United States. They examine the emergence and evolution of modern medicine and its key actors and institutions as well as discourses and practices. They show how health and disease are shaped by social, cultural, political, and technological forces and inextricably linked with questions of science, technology, modernity, religion, colonialism, capitalism, racism, globalization, humanitarianism, and the state.
    Our focus in this module is on recent developments towards the pharmaceuticalization of health, the molecularization of life, the commodification of the body, the privatization of medical care, and the securitization of public health. These developments have fundamentally transformed today?s landscape of therapeutic governance in fundamental ways.
    Aims
    To introduce students to the social study of medicine.
    To provide students with an understanding of the most important actors and institutions as well as discourses and practices that are characteristic of modern medicine.
    To provide students with an understanding of the social, cultural, political, and technological forces that are shaping modern medicine.
    To offer students the possibility to explore how questions of health and disease are linked with questions of science, technology, modernity, capitalism, and globalization.
    To demonstrate the value of social scientific approaches to medicine.
    To provide insights into the empirical, methodological, and epistemological debates in the social study of medicine.
    Course outline (second semester)
    1. Introduction ? The Changing Landscape of Therapeutic Governance
    2. The Pharmaceuticalization of Health I: Drugs and the Definition of Disease
    3. The Pharmaceuticalization of Health II: Capitalism and Consumerism
    4. The Molecularization of Life I: From Genetics to Molecular Biology
    5. The Molecularization of Life II: The Human Genome and the Dream of Personalized Medicine
    6. The Commodification of the Body I: Fragmentation and the Boundaries of the Body
    7. The Commodification of the Body II: Intellectual Property Rights and the Body
    8. The Privatization of Medical Care
    9. The Securitization of Public Health
    10. Revision Lecture
    Study abroad entry requirement: This module is ONLY available to independent and UNC-Chapel Hill Study Abroad Students.
    This module MUST be taken along side Introduction To Global Health 2.
    Credit level: 4
    Credit value: 15
    Assessment: coursework

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Some courses may require additional fees.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.

Please reference fall and spring course lists as not all courses are taught during both semesters.

Please note that some courses with locals have recommended prerequisite courses. It is the student's responsibility to consult any recommended prerequisites prior to enrolling in their course.