Symbolism and Aesthetics: end of century

Cours de Civilisation Française de la Sorbonne

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Symbolism and Aesthetics: end of century

  • Host University

    Cours de Civilisation Française de la Sorbonne

  • Location

    Paris, France

  • Area of Study

    French, French Culture, Literature

  • Language Level

    Intermediate, High Intermediate, Advanced, High Advanced, Superior

    Hours & Credits

  • Contact Hours

    15
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    1
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    1
  • Overview

    Content of the course: We propose a cycle of ten conferences, entitled: Symbolism and aesthetics "end of the century" - some figures

    Program by session:
    1- Charles Baudelaire, precursor of symbolism
    2- Paul Verlaine and the "first" cursed poet: Arthur Rimbaud
    3- Stéphane Mallarmé
    4- Tristan Corbière and Jules Laforgue, minor poets?
    5- Jules Barbey d'Aurévilly and the Dandyism
    6- Auguste Villiers-de-l'Isle-Adam, the ironic dreamer
    J.-K. Huysmans and the A-shock
    8- Rémy de Gourmont and Félix Fénéon: two must-sees
    9- Henri Murger: Scenes of Bohemian Life
    10- Examination

    Aims and Objectives
    - To make discovered authors, recognized or supposedly "minors", of the XIXth century
    - To propose a direct reading of the works of these authors
    - Reflect on what survives in this aesthetic "end of the century" of our days

    Educational approach
    1. Biographical presentation of the authors
    2. Readings and Comments

    Privileged supports
    During the conference:
    Slideshows
    Photocopies (reading texts)

    After the session:
    Photocopies

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.

ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System) credits are converted to semester credits/quarter units differently among U.S. universities. Students should confirm the conversion scale used at their home university when determining credit transfer.

Please reference fall and spring course lists as not all courses are taught during both semesters.