The Birth of Modern Europe

The American College of Greece

Course Description

  • Course Name

    The Birth of Modern Europe

  • Host University

    The American College of Greece

  • Location

    Athens, Greece

  • Area of Study

    European Studies, History

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • US Credits

    3
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4
  • Overview

    DESCRIPTION:
    The period from the High Middle Ages (12thc.) to the Religious Wars (16th-C- 17thc.) when the foundations of Modern Europe were laid.

    RATIONALE: 
    This course is fundamental for any student interested in the formation of modern European civilization. It introduces the student to the origins and development of basic European institutions.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES: 
    As a result of taking this course, the student should be able to:
    1. Examine the economic changes during the High Middle Ages and their interrelation with political, social and cultural changes.
    2. Outline the reasons for the rise of monarchy, cities, social classes, guilds and the nation-state.
    3. Define Humanism recognizing its origins, characteristics, variations and its contribution in shaping ‘new Europe’.
    4. Examine the varieties and upheavals of reformation and counterreformation.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of the influence of religion, technology, monarchy, and economic developments in setting the foundations of Modern Europe.

    METHOD OFTEACHING AND LEARNING:
    In congruence with the teaching and learning strategy of the college, the following tools are used:
    - Classes consist of lectures and interactive learning (class discussions on the issues arising from the historical subject matter illustrating continuity and change).
    - Office hours: Students are encouraged to make full use of the office hours of their instructor, where they can discuss the course material.
    - Use of a Blackboard site, where instructors can post lecture notes assignment instructions, timely announcements, and additional resources.
    - Use of library facilities: Students are encouraged to make use of the library facilities for further study as well as for preparation for the exams.