Roman Law and Common Law. Two Jurisprudential Traditions in Comparison

Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Roman Law and Common Law. Two Jurisprudential Traditions in Comparison

  • Host University

    Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

  • Location

    Milan, Italy

  • Area of Study

    Legal Studies

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • ECTS Credits

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4
  • Overview

    The introductory part of the course is meant to illustrate to the students the main features of the civil law and common law systems (the former based on the secular tradition of academic studies on Roman Law - Justinian’s Corpus iuris civilis - and nowadays on the idea of codification, the latter originated with the introduction of judging courts in the UK and now based on the system of judicial precedents) and their differences along with the description of the Roman jurisprudence and its methods. The second part the course will deal with the analysis of some British and US rulings in which the judges have argued on the basis of exemplary solutions of similar cases proposed by Roman jurists.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System) credits are converted to semester credits/quarter units differently among U.S. universities. Students should confirm the conversion scale used at their home university when determining credit transfer.

Please note that some courses with locals have recommended prerequisite courses. It is the student's responsibility to consult any recommended prerequisites prior to enrolling in their course.