Sicily: The Archaeology of the Hellenistic Mediterranean

The American University of Rome

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Sicily: The Archaeology of the Hellenistic Mediterranean

  • Host University

    The American University of Rome

  • Location

    Rome, Italy

  • Area of Study

    Archaeology

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    A 100‐level course in AH, ARC or CLS, or permission of the   instructor

    Hours & Credits

  • Credits

    3
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4
  • Overview

    This course explores the ancient archaeological sites of Eastern Sicily – from the archaic period to the Roman. The trip will introduce students to the cities Syracuse and Catania, which are both characterized by indigenous origins, founded as Greek colonies in the 8th century BCE, enjoyed autonomous rule under Sicilian tyrants, and then finally came under Roman rule as the first Roman province in the 3rd century BCE. Preliminary lecture(s) will cover the concepts of both Greek colonialism, as well as the spread of Roman imperialism and increasing overseas aggression, and briefly, Sicily’s post‐classical history. Visits in each city will include visits to archaeological and art museums, important ancient archaeological remains, and topographical walks. Students with interests in ancient colonialism, imperialism, urbanism, military history, and layered cultural identities across space and time will benefit from Sicily’s unique position as a strategic Mediterranean outpost.  The course is an ideal appendix to any course dealing with the art, archaeology, or history of Greece and/or Rome, allowing students to apply their knowledge of the eternal city, and observe similarities and differences of this multicultural island.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Some courses may require additional fees.

Availability of courses is based on enrollment numbers. All students should seek pre-approval for alternate courses in the event of last minute class cancellations