Single-Cell Technologies in Life Sciences

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Single-Cell Technologies in Life Sciences

  • Host University

    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

  • Location

    Amsterdam, The Netherlands

  • Area of Study

    Life Sciences

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • ECTS Credits

    3
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    1
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    2
  • Overview

    OVERVIEW
    Life Sciences research at the level of individual cells is a rapidly developing research area. Traditional single-cell technologies such as cytometry and microscopy are being used in combination with the  emerging field of single-cell genomics.

    COURSE CONTENT
    Life Sciences research at the level of individual cells is a rapidly developing research area. Traditional single-cell technologies such as cytometry and microscopy are being used in combination with the  emerging field of single-cell genomics. These single-cell technologies have important implications for our understanding of cellular behaviour, including cellular development, differentiation and decision-making. Cellular  processes can now be studied at an unprecedented resolution, and with astounding results: new light can now be shed on immunity and immune-related disorders, infectious diseases, and cancer. Understanding the technology behind these new applications is crucial to the processing and interpretation of data.  

    This intensive course combines theory with practice and will provide participants with in-depth and up-to-date expertise on advanced cytometry and microscopic imaging techniques. It is sure to be invaluable to everyone who is planning to complete a research internship. The course is divided into two parts: cytometry and microscopy. The cytometry lectures will teach students the principles of fluorescence cytometry analysis and sorting, imaging flow cytometry, and mass cytometry. Students will also be required to attend a demonstration session on cytometry and will learn all about essential data analysis methods (from multicolour cytometry to multidimensional data analysis) through tutorials and work group sessions. This part of the course will include an exciting  lecture on the emerging field of single-cell genomics. The second part of the course will focus on light microscopy on live and fixed specimens, confocal laser scanning microscopy, electron microscopy, and light-sheet microscopy. Special attention will be given to image analysis in a tutorial on ImageJ and  other commonly used software applications. 

    LEVEL
    Advanced Bachelor

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES
    After completing the course, students will: 
    •  Have in-depth knowledge of the applications of advanced cytometry and microscopic imaging techniques; 
    •  Be familiar with the principles of fluorescence cytometry analysis and sorting, imaging flow cytometry  and mass cytometry; 
    •  Understand essential analysis data methods for multicolour cytometry; 
    •  Know the basics of multidimensional data analysis; 
    •  Be able to distinguish applications of single-cell genomics methods; 
    •  Grasp the principles of light microscopy on live and fixed specimens, confocal laser scanning microscopy, electron microscopy, and light sheet microscopy; 
    •  Know more about essential data analysis methods and ImageJ; 
    •  Be familiar with advanced imaging methods, such as SIM, TIRF, and super resolution modalities.

    FIELD VISITS
    The course includes site visits to the microscopy and flow cytometry facility at VU University Medical Center.
    A guest speaker from a leading biotech firm will be invited to share their own personal and professional experiences in the field of single-cell technologies, as well as their views on the development of the field.

    TEACHING METHODS
    Lectures, site visits, demos

    FORM OF ASSESSMENT
    Small paper on a research project that incorporates the technology studied during this course (<1000 words).

    TARGET AUDIENCE
    Final year Bachelor's and Master’s students taking a Life Sciences programme, but the course is also open to Medical Engineering, Computational Biology, and Medical Sciences students