Poverty and Development: Dominican Case Study

Pontificia Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Poverty and Development: Dominican Case Study

  • Host University

    Pontificia Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra

  • Location

    Santiago, Dominican Republic

  • Area of Study

    International Economics, Latin American Studies, Race Studies

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

    Hours & Credits

  • Contact Hours

    45
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4
  • Overview

    Poverty and Development: Dominican Case Study

    DESCRIPTION    

    In this course, the concepts of poverty and development are studied through an analysis of national and international factors that deepen poverty and impede a country´s and/or a region´s progress and socio-economic development. Special emphasis is placed on the socio-cultural contexts of the Dominican Republic, the Caribbean, and Latin America.  The focus is on neoliberal economic policies, statistics related to international financial organizations, strategies and alternatives for socio-economic and human development in Latin American and Caribbean societies, and external debt and its impact on the poorest countries in the region.  

     OBJECTIVES

    1.    Understand the concepts of poverty and development, as well as the causes that promote it.
    2.    Identify the major internal and external sources of poverty and underdevelopment in the Dominican Republic, Caribbean, and Latin American regions.
    3.    Analyze the problems and limitations of undeveloped societies, with emphasis on poverty and marginalization in the Dominican Republic.
    4.    Identify the various development strategies, especially those that address community development as a starting point.

    ____________________________________
    *If English is not the student’s native language.


    CONTENTS:

    Unit I: Poverty and development.
    1.1    The level of economic and human development as an important factor of national  and international inequalities.
    1.2    The natural environment and resources.
    1.3    The demographic characteristics. Urban and rural population, age distribution and gender, economically active population, birth and death rates.
    1.4    Levels of development. Development and underdevelopment.
    1.5    Development models. Capitalism and Neoliberalism. The Socialist Model and its feasibility.
    1.6    The historical and cultural heritage.
    1.7    Problems and policies.

    Unit II: Poverty and inequality.
    2.1     The notion of poverty.
    2.2     Characteristics of poverty.
    2.3     Types of poverty.
    2.4     The culture of poverty.
     
    Unit III: External sources of poverty and underdevelopment.
    3.1     Contemporary trends.
    3.2     Colonialism and Neocolonialism.
    3.3     Influence of the global financial system. The International Monetary Fund (IMF),World Bank, and International Development Bank (IDB).
    3.4     External debt of developing countries.
    3.5     Globalization and Free Trade Agreements.
    3.6     The Free Trade Agreement: Potential impacts on the Dominican Republic.

    Unit IV: Factors affecting poverty.
    4.1    Illiteracy and sub-schooling.
    4.2    Access to sources of employment and income levels.
    4.3    Migration problems.
    4.4    High dependence on agriculture.
    4.5    Government policies.
    4.6    Lack of development opportunities.
     
    Unit V: Human Development.
    5.1     Concept of human development.
    5.2     Characteristics of human development.
    5.3     Factors and indicators of human development.
    5.4     Technological development.
          

    Unit VI: Strategies for human development.  
    6.1     Various strategies.
    6.2     The community as a starting point. The self-managed community.
    6.3     Decentralization and strengthening of local governments.
    6.4     Gender equity and women's participation.
    6.5     Democracy and development.

    Assessment Description Percent
    Assigned readings and research topics of limited scope Using annotations, the material discussed in class, and the content of the assigned readings, each student must write five (5) reports in which to reflect upon their personal views and perspectives on the subjects under study. 25%
    Oral Presentations Individual and/or group presentations on assigned topics, depending upon the complexity of the issues, using a variety of resources. 25%
    Participation Attendance, punctuality, motivation, and cooperation during class discussions will be evaluated and the latter graded based upon the respect for a diversity of opinions and points of view. 20%
    Final work Each student must write an essay based upon what was studied and developed by the students in their written reports and classroom presentations. The essays should reflect the student´s personal views and perspectives on the chosen topic(s).         30%
    Total   100%

    BIBLIOGRAPHY:

    Abel, C. (1993). Puerto Rico: A Model of Welfare Capitalism? C. 1945-1970. In C. Abel & C. M. Lewis (Eds)., Welfare, Poverty and Development in Latin America, p. 257-281. London: Macmillan Press.

    Americas Watch: National Coalition for Haitian Refugees. (1992). A Troubled Year: Haitians in the Dominican Republic. Retrieved March 6, 2016 at https://www.hrw.org/reports/pdfs/d/domnrep/domrep92o.pdf

    Anonymous. (2000). The Dominican Republic's war on Haitian workers. Migration World Magazine, 28(1), 10.  
    Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/212010503?accountid=31480

    Bosman, M.M. & Amen, M.M. (2008). Recasting Neo-liberalism in the Americas: A Critique of the Preliminary Needs Assessment of the Millennium Development Goals in the Dominican Republic. In B. K. Gils, Globalization and the Global Politics of Justice, p. 133-143. New York: Routledge. (pdf)

    Cabezas, A. L. (2009). Economies of Desire: Sex and Tourism in Cuba and the Dominican Republic. Philadelphia, PA (U.S.): Temple University Press. (some pages scanned)

    Card, D. (and others). (2007). The labor market impacts of youth training in the Dominican Republic: evidence from a randomized evaluation. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research. (pdf)

    Castro, M. J. (1999). Introduction. In M. J. Castro, Free Markets, open Societies, Closed Borders? Trends in International Migration and Immigration Policy in the Americas, p. 1-6. University of Miami: North-South Center Press. (pdf)

    Chase, J. (Ed.). (2002). Introduction. In J. Chase (Ed.), The Spaces of Neoliberalism: Land, Place and Family in Latin America, p. 1-23. Bloomfield, CT (U.S.): Kumarian Press.

    Colón, A. & Poggio, S. (2010). Women’s Work and Neoliberal Globalization: Implications for Gender Equity. In E. Maier & N. Lebon (Eds.) Women’s Activism in Latin America and the Caribbean: Engendering Social Justice, Democratizing Citizenship, 47-59. Rutgers University Press. Available through Project Muse. (pdf)

    Deere, C. D. & Royce, F. S. (2009). Introduction: The Rise and Impact of National and Transnational Rural Social Movements in Latin America. In C. D. Deere & F. S. Royce, Rural Social Movements in Latin America: Organizing for Sustainable Livelihoods, p. 1-32. Gainesville: University Press of Florida. (pdf)

    Durand, F. & Silva, S. (Eds.). (1998). Organized Business, Economic Change, Democracy in Latin America. Coral Gables, FL (University of Miami, U.S.): North-South Center Press.


    Durand, F. & Silva, S. (1998). Organized Business and Politics in Latin America. In F. Durand & S. Silva, Organized Business, Economic Change, Democracy in Latin America, p. 1-51. Coral Gables, FL (University of Miami, U.S.): North-South Center Press. (scan p. 1-4 with Espinal)

    Espinal, R. (1998). Business and Politics in the Dominican Republic. In F. Durand & S. Silva, Organized Business, Economic Change, Democracy in Latin America, p. 99-122. Coral Gables, FL (University of Miami, U.S.): North-South Center Press. (scan)

    Gagain, Jr. J. R. (2008). The ‘Dominican Model’: A ‘Work in Progress’ towards sustainable Human Development. In B. K. Gils, Globalization and the Global Politics of Justice, p. 143-151. New York: Routledge. (pdf)

    Gils, B. K. (Ed.). (2008). Globalization and the Global Politics of Justice. New York: Routledge.

    Gils, B. K. (2008). The Global Politics of Justice. In Globalization and the Global Politics of Justice, p. 1-4. New York: Routledge. (scan with Bosman)

    Holmes, G. (2011). The Rich, the Powerful and the Endangered: Conservation Elites and the Dominican Republic. In D. Brockington & R. Duffy (Eds.), Capitalism and Conservation, p. 156-178. Blackwell Publishing. Available Online through Wiley Online Library. (pdf of this chapter)

    Howard, D. (2001). Coloring the Nation: Race and Ethnicity in the Dominican Republic. Boulder, CO (U.S.): L. Rienner. (intro scanned)

    Human Rights Watch. April, 2002. “Illegal People”: Haitians and Dominico-Haitians in the Dominican Republic., Vol. 14, No. 1 (B). Retrieved March 5, 2016 at https://www.hrw.org/reports/2002/domrep/domrep0402.pdf

    Kay, C. (2005). Perspectives on Rural Poverty and Development Strategies in Latin America. Working Paper Series N. 419. The Netherlands: Institute of Social Studies.  Available from the author on Research Gate.

    Maier, E. & Lebon, N. (Eds). (2010). Women’s Activism in Latin America and the Caribbean: Engendering Social Justice, Democratizing Citizenship. Rutgers University Press. Available through Project Muse.

    Mashek, R. W. & Vetter, S. G. (1983). The Inter-American Foundation in the Dominican Republic: A Decade of Support for Local Development Organizations. Rosslyn, VA (U.S.): Inter-American Foundation. (some pages scanned)


    Mitchell, C. (1999). Restricted Migration and Caribbean Development: Policies and Prospects. In M. J. Castro, Free Markets, open Societies, Closed Borders? Trends in International Migration and Immigration Policy in the Americas, p. 213-224. University of Miami: North-South Center Press. (pdf)

    Nuñez Sarmiento, M. (2010). A “Top-Down”- “Bottom-Up” Model : Four decades of women’s employment and gender ideology in Cuba. In E. Maier & N. Lebon (Eds.) Women’s Activism in Latin America and the Caribbean: Engendering Social Justice, Democratizing Citizenship, 76-91. Rutgers University Press. Available through Project Muse. (pdf)

    Roberts, S. M. (2012). Worlds Apart? Economic Geography and Questions of “Development”. In T. Barnes (Ed)., The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Economic Geography, p. 552-566. Hoboken, NJ (U.S.): Wiley. Available online through Academic Complete and Wiley Online.

    Safa, H. (2010). Female-Headed Households and Poverty in Latin America. In E. Maier & N. Lebon (Eds.) Women’s Activism in Latin America and the Caribbean: Engendering Social Justice, Democratizing Citizenship, 60-75. Rutgers University Press. Available through Project Muse. (pdf)

    Safa, H. (2002). Women and Globalization: Lesson from the Dominican Republic. In J. Chase (Ed.), The Spaces of Neoliberalism: Land, Place and Family in Latin America, p. 141-158. Bloomfield, CT (U.S.): Kumarian Press. (scan)

    Steger, M. B. (2010). Neoliberalism: a very short introduction. New York: Oxford University Press. Available online through Academic Complete.

    Timms, B. F. (2008). Development theory and domestic agriculture in the Caribbean: recurring crises and missed opportunities. Caribbean Geography, 15(2), 101.

    Wiard, H.J. & Kline, H. F. (2011). Latin American Politics and Development. Westview Press. Available through EBL (Online).

     

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.