Pre-Columbian Art History

Universidad de Salamanca Cursos Internacionales en Cusco

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Pre-Columbian Art History

  • Host University

    Universidad de Salamanca Cursos Internacionales en Cusco

  • Location

    Cusco, Peru

  • Area of Study

    Art History, Latin American Studies, Spanish

  • Language Level

    Advanced

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper Language/ Upper Content

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Contact Hours

    45
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4
  • Overview

    Pre-Columbian Art History

    CURSOS INTERNACIONALES DE LA UNIVERSIDAD DE SALAMANCA – INTERNATIONAL STUDIES ABROAD – CUSCO PROGRAM


    I. LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION:
    This course will be taught in Spanish 

    II. AUDIENCE:
    The course is only for ISA students – Cursos Internacionales de la Universidad de Salamanca. No other students will be allowed to take it.

    III. CONTACT HOURS:
    The course will consist of 45 teaching hours

    IV. GENERAL COURSE DESCRIPTION AND COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    This course provides a comprehensive survey of the main artistic and iconographic manifestations of Pre-Columbian peoples of South and Mesoamerica, with a main focus on the Andean region. Throughout the course, we will explore how western categories and approaches to “Art” may prove inadequate to account for Native American conceptualizations and experiences related to materiality, the role of the image, and the built environment. Similarly, we will endeavor to contextualize the art and architecture of Pre- Hispanic peoples within the broader socio-cultural framework of the societies that created it.Thus, we will explore the cosmologies, social structure, historical circumstances, material culture, etc. within which the production of art took place.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    - Introduce the students to the art and material culture of the Pre-Columbian peoples of South and Mesoamerica.
    - Facilitate an understanding of the cultural logics that guided the production of art among Pre-Columbian peoples.
    - Provide the students with analytical tools to critically assess the contents of the course.
    - Spread an interest in this class and engage the students in its dynamics.

    VI. REQUIRED READINGS.
    The textbook required for this class is Rebecca Stone-Miller's “Art of the Andes: from Chavín to Inca” (Thames & Hudson, 1996).

    *SAMPLE* VII. COURSE CALENDAR:

    1
    Introduction to Pre-Columbian art
    Mesoamerica: Teotihuacan, The Olmecs and the Zapotecs

    Mesoamerica: The Aztecs and the Mayas

    Introduction to the Andes.The Preceramic Period
    Caral

    The Initial Period: Kotosh, Cerro Sechin
    Chavin de Huantar

    Paracas
    Nazca

    Extra-academic activity

    The Early intermediate Period: The Moche
    The Middle Horizon: The Wari

    The Middle Horizon: Tiwanaku
    The Late Intermediate Period: The Chimú, Pachacamac

    Inca architecture and the sacred landscape; terraces, fountains and canals;stonework and construction techniques; Building typologies (kanchas, palaces, temples, plazas, tambos, ushnus); urban planning
    The city of Cuzco and its architecture
    10 
    Qhapac Ñan or the Inca road system
    The architecture of the Sacred Valley: Royal Estates and design principles
    Inca stone-carving
    11 
    Textile Textiles, tocapus and Inca visual language
    Inca art during colonial times
    12/13 
    Final presentations and final exam

    VIII. EVALUATION CRITERIA:
    Attendance and assignments 20%
    Final paper and presentation 40%
    Final exam 40%

    IX. ATTENDANCE POLICY:
    Attendance requirements for this class follow the ISA-Cusco Handbook.

    X. FINAL PAPER AND PRESENTATION:
    For the final paper the student will choose a class-related topic of their interest, in consultation with the instructor. On week four the student must turn in a proposed topic and a list of references. The papers should not exceed twelve (12) pages or be shorter than ten (10) pages, excluding references, images or tables. They should be typed in Times New Roman, 12-point font, and double-spaced.

    Late papers will not be accepted except in cases of unforeseeable emergencies.

    The final presentation will be based on the student’s final paper and will be focused on the analysis of his/her research. Students may use Power-point or any other media approved by the professor. Presentations will not exceed 15 minutes and will not be shorter than 10 minutes.

    XI. EXAM:
    The final exam will be administered during class time on the date noted in the class schedule. The exam will review the entire course and will be graded out of 100%. Rescheduling of exams will not be accepted except in cases of documented unforeseeable emergencies. Traveling and fieldwork do not qualify as such, so, please, plan accordingly.

    XII. ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT:
    Plagiarism is an unquestionable violation of the academic integrity that every college student should be committed to. Papers that present clear evidence of plagiarism will automatically earn and “F”, and in most cases will represent a final failing grade.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.