Indigenous Politics & Policy

University of Queensland

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Indigenous Politics & Policy

  • Host University

    University of Queensland

  • Location

    Brisbane, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Australian Culture, Indigenous Studies, Pacific Studies, Political Science

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    Recommended Prerequisite

    4 credits of political science courses

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Host University Units

    2
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Course Description
    This course traces the political relationship between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples of Australia as an instance of wider global relations among indigenous societies, colonial powers and contemporary national and international regimes and institutions. Students will gain an understanding of government policies and the responses to these practices by indigenous peoples by critically evaluating the political frameworks and policy responses to these practices by indigenous peoples by critically evaluating the political frameworks and policy responses used to deal with indigenous-settler relations. The course will consider - among other topics - land, citizenship and identity, self-determination, "Close the Gap" and constitutional recognition.
     
     
    Course Introduction
    Complex and challenging political problems continue to shape relations between Indigenous and Settler peoples. Public debate is often infused with the rhetoric of crisis. Politicians and other policy makers frequently make bold pronouncements only to have their "new approach" reworked in subsequent years. This course traces the political relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples of Australia as an example of a wider global phenomenon, and an opportunity to examine relations among indigenous societies, colonial powers and contemporary national and international regimes and institutions. Students will develop an understanding of often-paradoxical government policies introduced to manage this relationship, as well as the responses by Aboriginal people.
     
    The course will examine a range of different approaches to understanding political relationships between Indigenous people and settlers, investigate a range of historical policy approaches, and critically analyse important current issues and approaches in Indigenous policy. The course will explore ? among other topics ? Aboriginal deaths in custody, self-determination and 'Closing the Gap' in order to begin to understand the theoretical and cultural perspectives that underpin Indigenous policy and to provide a framework for undertaking critical analysis of current policy approaches and prescriptions.
     
     
    Learning Objectives
    After successfully completing this course you should be able to:
    • apply a critical understanding of the history and politics of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal relations up to the present day.
    • to identify and critically evaluate the assumptions that drive policy frameworks and strategies.
    • apply the necessary tools and skills for critical analysis in reading, textual analysis and writing.
    • appreciate, through personal reflection, that the recognition of cultural difference is not just a matter of identifying racial categories or cultural practices, but also identifying the values and knowledge systems that inform them.
    • grasp and assess the range of arguments articulated across the Australian political landscape in relation to issues impacting upon Aboriginal peoples.
     
    Class Contact
    2 Seminar hours, 1 Tutorial hour
     
     
    Assessment Summary
    Tutorial Participation: 10%
    Attendance: 10%
    Paper (Textual Analysis 1): 20%
    Paper (Textual Analysis 2): 20%
    Essay: 40%

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Some courses may require additional fees.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.