Introduction to Peace & Conflict Analysis

University of Queensland

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Introduction to Peace & Conflict Analysis

  • Host University

    University of Queensland

  • Location

    Brisbane, Australia

  • Area of Study

    International Affairs

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Host University Units

    2
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Course Description
    Introduces students to peace and conflict studies. In particular, it focuses on the causes of war and violence, the relationship between security and development, human security, the ethical and legal restraints on war, the politics and practice of humanitarian aid, and the role of international institutions such as the United Nations and Red Cross. The course will focus on contemporary cases, focusing on - among other things - the genocide in Rwanda, emergency response to the tsunami, the debt crisis and global poverty, the challenges of rebuilding Iraq, the humanitarian disaster in Darfur, and the question of UN reform.
     
     
    Course Introduction
    This course is designed to introduce students to the burgeoning field of peace and conflict studies (PACS). It is a compulsory course for any student electing to do the major or double-major in PACS. It is also a highly recommended supplement for those pursuing an international relations major. Since the subject and course is interdisciplinary in nature, students from disciplines other than politics and international studies may also find that it fits well with their major field of concentration, especially (but not only) in the fields of law, history, sociology, development studies, journalism, and psychology.
     
    'Introduction to Peace & Conflict Analysis' focuses on the causes of war and violence, the relationship between security and development, human security, the ethical and legal restraints on war, the politics and practice of humanitarian aid, the role of the media in shaping conflict (perception), and the role of international institutions such as the United Nations and the International Committee of the Red Cross. The course will examine contemporary cases such as the Rwandan Genocide, the Arab Spring, the politics behind the media representations of war/peace, the emergency response to the 2004 Boxing Day Tsunami, the challenges of rebuilding Afghanistan and Iraq, and the humanitarian disaster in Darfur, among others.
     
     
    Learning Objectives
    After successfully completing this course you should be able to:
    • Understand the meaning of key terms such as ?human security?, 'responsibility to protect', ?structural prevention?, ?complex emergencies?, ?just cause?, ?non-violence?, 'peacekeeping' etc.
    • Explain the basic international legal and institutional framework in which debates about PACS take place.
    • Discuss techniques and processes involved in the peaceful resolution of violent conflict.
    • Understand the development of alternative paradigms for the resolution of violent conflict.
    • Assess the role of the United Nations and other organisations engaged in preventing, managing, and rebuilding after war.
    • Understand the key dilemmas that confront policy makers and advocates today.
    • Appreciate the complexity of coordinating multifaceted responses to humanitarian emergencies.
     
    Class Contact
    2 Lecture hours, 1 Tutorial hour
     
     
    Assessment Summary
    Tutorial Presentation: 20%
    Essay: 40%
    Final Exam: 40%

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Some courses may require additional fees.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.