Architectural History and Theory: Orientations

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Architectural History and Theory: Orientations

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Architecture, Construction Management, Design Management, Industrial Design

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    This unit of study is designed for architecture/design student majors

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Description
    The subject introduces key themes in history, framed in terms of architectural and landscape examples from antiquity until the beginning of the 19th century, and theory, dealing with the nature of design, and with issues pertaining to thinking, reasoning and argument. Themes may include ideas of architectural and landscape origins; theories and applications of geometry, composition, proportion and order; relations between antiquity and subsequent architectural developments; the architect / landscape architect as historical figure; the role and influence of architectural treatises; ideas that underpin the writing of architectural history; and the historical development of architectural and landscape theory. Theoretical concerns address how buildings come to be the way they are; the concept of position; the nature of design; what is architecture; the nature of creativity; and other issues.
    Subject objectives
    On successful completion of this subject students will have achieved the following:
    1. an understanding of key themes and events shaping architectural history and theory in different places and periods
    2. an understanding of social, political, cultural and scientific mechanisms that bear upon the development of architectural history and theory
    3. an understanding of the diverse artistic and organisational roles which architects have played in the creation of built environments
    4. an understanding of the methodologies involved in studying architectural history and theory as a scholarly discipline
    5. to develop skills in formal written argument, textual analysis, referencing, the use of written authorities and accounts, and the use of sound academic prose.
    This subject also contributes to the faculty's five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (see 'Graduate Attribute Development') through the following course intended learning outcomes:
    Ability to position work within an extended disciplinary context (A.3)
    Ability to communicate ideas effectively in a variety of ways including oral, written, visual, physical and digital (C.2)
    Ability to engage in, and contribute to, debate at a professional level (C.4)
    Ability to develop innovative approaches (I.1)
    Ability to understand and challenge disciplinary conventions (I.2)
    Ability to produce inspirational responses that exemplify integration of learning experiences (I.4)
    Ability to source, evaluate and utilise appropriate academic and professional references (R.1)
    Ability to independently select and apply appropriate research methodologies to carry out investigative study (R.2)
    Ability to analyse, synthesise and formulate complex ideas, arguments and rationales and use initiative to explore alternatives (R.3)
    Teaching and learning strategies
    Weekly on campus: 2 hrs lecture, 1 hr tutorial
    The subject will be delivered through a combination of illustrated lectures and tutorials. In general the subject is based around reading, discussion and research. The tutorials are offered to assist with this reading and to encourage discussion. Student participation and understanding in tutorials and lectures will rely on a degree of individual reading and research. The contact hours will usually comprise two formal illustrated lectures each of one hour?s duration, followed by a one-hour tutorial or seminar class, each week. This pattern may be varied to accommodate site visits, workshops, guest lectures, group work, or other topical events as they occur.
    Content
    Themes presented in the subject may include: ideas of architectural origins; theories and applications of geometry, composition, proportion and order; relations between antiquity and subsequent architectural developments; the development and use of different forms of representation, including perspective; the architect as historical figure; the role and influence of architectural treatises; impacts of developments in scientific thinking; ideas that underpin the writing of architectural history; the historical development of architectural theory; cultural encounters between East and West and their impact on architecture.
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Reading exercises: written analysis of set tutorial readings
    Objective(s):
    This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
    This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):
    A.3, C.2, C.4, I.1, I.2, I.4, R.1, R.2 and R.3
    Weight: 40%
    Assessment task 2: Research Project: essay
    Objective(s):
    This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
    This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):
    A.3, C.2, C.4, I.1, I.2, I.4, R.1, R.2 and R.3
    Weight: 60%
    Required texts
    This subject does not require specific text books to be purchased.
    Full details of all readings required for the tutorial discussions will be provided. Such readings will be available digitally in e-Readings.
    In addition, individual students will need to find for themselves academic papers and books for Assignment 2, the Research Essay.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.