Architecture and Landscape Cultures

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Architecture and Landscape Cultures

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Architecture, Design Management, Industrial Design, Landscape Architecture

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    This unit of study is designed for architecure/design student majors

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Description
    This introductory subject fosters an awareness of a set of important cultural and environmental design issues as they relate to the built environment and how value systems and ethical positions respond to and affect design. Specifically, the subject presents students with an understanding of how architecture and landscape architecture influence, and are influenced by, cultural and environmental issues. To this end, the subject examines selected histories and theories as a way to critically examine architecture and landscape architecture's response to climate, politics, and traditions, as well as explore the contemporary social and cultural roles played by both disciplines.
    Subject objectives
    On successful completion of this subject students will have achieved the following:
    1. Provides a forum to discuss a range of contemporary social and cultural issues.
    2. Introduces students to a range of different methods and tools used in the discussion, debate, and critical evaluation of design ideas.
    3. Develops an understanding of how climatic, geographic, social and cultural conditions influence design responses.
    4. Develops key disciplinary research attributes of observation, ?description and analysis.
    5. Introduces students to the principles of academic research.
    6. Cultivates an understanding of appropriate academic conduct.
    This subject also contributes to the faculty's five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (see 'Graduate Attribute Development') through the following course intended learning outcomes:
    Ability to establish and develop an informed and ethical position toward social, technical and environmental practices (A.2)
    Ability to recognise and appreciate cultural diversity including Indigenous perspectives (A.4)
    Ability to communicate ideas effectively in a variety of ways including oral, written, visual, physical and digital (C.2)
    Ability to constructively engage with subject learning activities (C.3)
    Ability to develop innovative approaches (I.1)
    Ability to understand and challenge disciplinary conventions (I.2)
    Ability to initiate and execute meaningful self-directed iterative processes (I.3)
    Ability to independently select and apply appropriate research methodologies to carry out investigative study (R.2)
    Ability to reflect and engage in self-critique and critical thinking (R.5)
    Teaching and learning strategies
    The pattern will generally consist of weekly lectures and tutorials. The lecture will normally be a formal illustrated lecture on a pre-announced theme or subject of the lecturer?s devising.
    Content
    The subject may include but not be limited to the following general topics: definitions of architecture and landscape architecture as a practice and a discipline; the similarities and differences between a profession and discipline; the impact climate and site have on built form; representation as a way of drawing and presentation of cultural and political identities; the ethical and the social responsibilities of the professional and academic; cross-cultural and global approaches to contemporary conditions of environmental and social transformation.
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Learning Attributes
    Objective(s):
    This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:
    1, 5 and 6
    This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):
    A.2, A.4 and C.3
    Type: Exercises
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 20%
    Assessment task 2: Mapping: Technique Development
    Objective(s):
    This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:
    2, 3, 4 and 5
    This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):
    C.2, I.3, R.2 and R.5
    Type: Project
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 50%
    Assessment task 3: Mapping: Final Project
    Objective(s):
    This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:
    2, 3, 4 and 5
    This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):
    C.2, I.1, I.2 and R.5
    Type: Project
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 30%

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.