Audiences, Users, Publics Communities

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Audiences, Users, Publics Communities

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Broadcasting, Communication, Intercultural Communications, International Communications, Journalism, Mass Communications, Media and Journalism, Media Studies, Public Relations, Radio/Television/Film, Social Media

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    58226 Media, Mediation, Power

    These requisites may not apply to students in certain courses

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    8
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    5
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    7
  • Overview

    Description
    This subject equips students to analyse changing concepts of the media audience and critically evaluate claims about the relationships between media and people individually and collectively. It explores magazines, newspapers, television and online and mobile media, their 'content' (such as programs, as information, as models for defining identity), the various ways they are used (such as memory supports, as agents of virtual travel, as archives, as networking tools), and considers how audiences as active 'readers' increasingly produce their own meanings from the resources the media provide. Students explore developments including 'virtual' communities, virtual publics and political online activism as examples of how audiences are evolving into dynamic meaning-makers and 'producers'. This subject provides an implicitly historical overview of changing theorisations of audiences. It gives students further experience in formulating and conducting their own research focused on people's actual relationships to diverse media.
    Subject objectives
    a. Critically evaluate relevant media studies literature to identify key questions
    b. Explain key theoretical concepts in media studies and the significance of mediated communications in historical context
    c. Investigate the political and social importance of new (media) technologies using established media studies methods to analyse empirical data
    d. Discuss their research findings in the light of relevant media studies theory and previous literature
    Teaching and learning strategies
    This subject will be delivered using a combination of lectures, tutorials and literature searching workshops. Lectures will introduce students to key concepts, research approaches, and historical movements in media audience research.
    Tutorials will include discussions of the significance of mediated communications through time, invite students to reflect on their own experiences as audiences, users, publics, and members of communities, and ?produsers?, and workshop students' individual research projects. Assisted by their tutor, students will design and conduct an original media studies research project as a pilot study for an honours proposal OR in response to a notional or real industry client.
    Content
    Technological changes are driving the evolution of people?s relationship with media. Once conceived of as mass audiences, people are now also recognised as users, publics and communities. This subject invites students to investigate the development over time of conceptions of people as audiences, users, publics and communities. The content will be divided into the following themes: mass audiences; audiences as individuals; audiences as communities (including diverse communities within society as well as virtual and imagined communities) and publics; audiences, celebrity and identity; people as users; people as media ?produsers?; audiences, users, publics and communities as markets; media users as activists (GetUp; Crikey; electioneering). We will explore the evolving concepts of audiences, users, publics and communities through a consideration of evolving interactivity and convergence of television, live entertainment, social media, Twitter, blogging, the internet and metamorphosing communication devices (including smartphones, iPads, smartTV and other interactive television ?return path? technologies such as telephone, mobile SMS (text messages), radio, broadband/digital subscriber lines (ADSL), cable). The program will include a lecture on ethical considerations in research.
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Critical Appraisal and Research Design
    Objective(s):
    a
    Weight: 30%
    Length:
    1,500 words (1,200 for critical appraisal, 300 for research design)
    Criteria:
    Clarity of written expression
    Clarity and strength of argument
    Relevance of sources selected for annotation
    Accuracy of referencing
    Suitability of research methodology
    Relevance of opinions expressed
    Assessment task 2: Progress Report on Research Project
    Objective(s):
    a, b and c
    Weight: 20%
    Length:
    1,000 words and five minutes oral presentation
    Criteria:
    Clarity and strength of argument
    Clarity of written expression
    Clarity of oral expression
    Relevance of written sources
    Accuracy of referencing
    Suitability of research methodology
    Assessment task 3: Researching Audiences, Users, Publics, Communities
    Objective(s):
    a, b, c and d
    Weight: 50%
    Length:
    2,500 words
    Criteria:
    Clarity and strength of argument
    Clarity of written expression
    Relevance of written sources
    Suitability of research methodology
    Depth of analysis
    Accuracy and consistency of referencing
    Relevance of issues discussed
    Relevance of opinions expressed

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.