Circuit Analysis

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Circuit Analysis

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Electrical Engineering, Electronics Engineering, Engineering Science, Mechanical Engineering

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    48520 Electronics and Circuits AND 48521 Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Description
    In this subject students are assumed to have knowledge of basic devices such as ideal and real voltage and current sources and loads; resistors; capacitors, inductors and coupled coils; diodes and operational amplifiers, and basic circuit analysis skills such as Kirchhoff's current and voltage laws, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems, mesh and nodal analysis, symmetry, circuit transformation and superposition. Using this understanding as a starting point, the subject introduces the basic theoretical models that underpin signals and system analysis. Topics covered are sinusoidal steady-state analysis using phasor technique, Laplace transforms; solution of ODEs using Laplace transforms; power in AC circuits, electrical distribution networks and devices, multiphase systems; transfer (network) functions, poles and zeros, s-plane analysis, Bode plots; first- and second-order systems; response to periodic and non-periodic inputs, time domain solution, frequency domain solution; and arbitrary systems analysis, response to an arbitrary input using convolution; frequency selective circuits; Fourier series, the Fourier transform; two-port circuits. Students use experimental design and testing, MATLAB and analytical modelling to investigate real-world devices. Comparison of experimental results and model predictions is emphasised in the laboratory sessions.
    Subject objectives
    Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
    1. Analyse linear systems at an appropriate level of accuracy;
    2. Transform problems into simplified forms facilitating easy solutions;
    3. Perform advanced frequency domain calculations and use transformation techniques;
    4. Apply experimental design and testing, Matlab and analytical modelling to investigate real-world devices.
    This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    Identify and apply relevant problem solving methodologies [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (B.1)
    Design components, systems and/or processes to meet required specifications [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.3, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (B.2)
    Implement and test solutions [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.2, 2.3,] (B.5)
    Apply abstraction, mathematics and/or discipline fundamentals to analysis, design and operation [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2] (C.1)
    Develop models using appropriate tools such as computer software, laboratory equipment and other devices [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.2,2.3, 2.4] (C.2)
    Evaluate model applicability, accuracy and limitations [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.1,2.2] (C.3)
    Communicate effectively in ways appropriate to the discipline, audience and purpose [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.2] (E.1)
    Work as an effective member or leader of diverse teams within a multi-level, multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural setting [EA Stage 1 Competency:2.4, 3.2, 3.6] (E.2)
    Teaching and learning strategies
    Class time is used for lectures, tutorials and laboratories.
    Student learning is enhanced by attendance at and participation in all scheduled classes.
    In addition to this, an average student is expected to spend at least 3 hours per week in activities that will support their learning. This may include reading of textbook and lecture notes, attempting tutorial questions and preparation for laboratory sessions and assessment items.
    Lectures (weekly details in Timetable)
    This subject includes lectures throughout the semester. Lectures are supported by a textbook. You will gain most from the lectures if you read each week's material in advance.
    Tutorials (weekly details in Timetable)
    Each student is expected to attend the scheduled tutorial classes each week, except when the laboratory sessions are scheduled.
    Tutorials are an opportunity for YOU to apply some of the material presented in lectures and to ask questions about problems or concepts you do not understand. After attending the lectures and reading the relevant sections of the course notes you should attempt the exercises at the end of each chapter. This requires a commitment from you to work BEFORE coming to a tutorial as well as during the tutorial time and to attempt to solve some of the exercises.
    Your tutor may work through some selected problems to provide a model for the type of thinking you would need to do to solve the exercises. Although answers and some worked solutions are provided, you will learn very little if you do not attempt the problems before referring to the solutions.
    Students will be allocated to a tutorial group during Week 1. The location of the tutorial may be different from that described on the web enrolment. Requests for transfer of tutorial group must be made via email to the Subject Coordinator.
    Laboratories (weekly details in Timetable)
    Each student is required to attend all the scheduled laboratory sessions.
    Laboratory attendance is compulsory. Students who wish to submit laboratory assignments, which assess knowledge associated with the lab work, must attend and participate in all lab sessions to be eligible to submit lab assignments and get the possible marks of 20. You must read the laboratory notes and complete the pre-work before coming to the laboratory.
    Students who undertook the laboratory work during a previous semester are exempted from the laboratory attendance requirement. Students who wish to retain their mark from a previous semester should advise the subject coordinator via email.
    Laboratories are an important part of the learning experience in this subject. Students are expected to attend and participate in learning activities in the laboratory sessions. Students who miss or are late in attending the laboratory sessions without providing documented evidence of illness or misadventure will not be eligible to submit lab assignments. In this context, late is deemed to be attendance more than 20 minutes after the scheduled start of the laboratory session. Students who are late for the laboratory sessions will be refused entry to the laboratory.
    You will be expected to work in groups.
    Lab tutors will continue to encourage students to develop appropriate safe working practices while in Engineering laboratories. This is in accordance with the Environment Health & Safety (EHS) requirements for conduct in all UTS laboratories (in-line with NSW Occupational Health and Safety legislation)
    Further, staff will enforce EHS requirements where necessary, and this includes the exclusion of students who are not wearing appropriate, enclosed footwear.
    Learning Strategy in Circuit Analysis
    What matters most in this subject is what you do, not what the teaching team does. Our most important role will be to define what it is you should learn and to confirm via examination that your understanding is comprehensive and thorough. Learning in this subject is best achieved by a guided working through of exercises of different types. Like playing a sport or learning a language, it is the practise that develops skill. The subject is structured so that you will have plenty of time for working on and exploring exercises. You must set aside at least five hours per week out-of-class time for this subject in addition to the contact hours. Some of you may need more time if you need to refresh the pre-requisite subjects.
    You have already had some exposure to the material in Introduction to Electrical Engineering and Electronics and Circuits. This subject is intended to raise your skill level from a basic understanding to advanced competence. A number of resources will be provided either in LDC 1 or on UTSOnline. These include background revision material in mathematics and circuit theory and various references containing many excellent explanations and worked examples. Additionally, there are many Circuit Analysis courses available on the internet.
    Lectures are intended to provide an introduction and guide to the subject material. The lecturer is not a teacher; that is why we do not use the term in university. The lecturer is a guide to show you the direction in which to go and to flag the important aspects of the subject.
    We expect you to revise your lecture notes and textbook, and then use them, with your study group and back-up materials to attempt the tutorial problems. Tutorials are the key to understanding the course as they provide a small-group learning environment with an expert in the field. Only when you have tried seriously to do the exercises, should you ask for help from the staff. If you need help, see the teaching staff at one of the published times. If you cannot make these times, then make an appointment with your tutor. There may be times when you feel stuck and very frustrated - in times like this seek help ? do not linger ? and remember the usual experience of this sequence is genuine and deep learning.
    Using Matlab will enhance your problem solving productivity. It allows you to easily invert matrices and find roots of polynomials as well as graph solutions so you can verify that they are consistent with your expectations and the basic circuit laws.
    Most of you will already be aware of the importance of group work and group learning in the practice of engineering. Be supportive of this process and you are far more likely to succeed. Rather than dissecting the work into separate isolated modules it is better to work together on the tutorial problems. Provide assistance to each other along the way and learn from the difficulties or strengths of the others. Learning in this way can lead to both social and academic rewards.
    As in Introduction to Electrical Engineering, the ability of a group to achieve its goals depends very much on the dynamics of the group, the willingness of each member to take appropriate responsibilities and roles, planning and reflective practice. There is no single recipe for success. Here are a few factors that may help:
    positive interdependence: a sense of working together for a common goal and caring about each other?s learning;
    individual accountability: every team member caries their load;
    abundant verbal, face-to-face interaction: learners explain, argue, elaborate and link material and learning experiences;
    sufficient social skills, including appropriate leadership, communication, trust and conflict resolution skills;
    team reflection: the team periodically assesses, how they are working together and how they can improve things.
    Clearly, learning in a group is desirable. However, your practical circumstances may make this process difficult. In this case explore the use of the online support we provide on UTSOnline to help you.
    Content
    Competency in the following topics is expected by the end of the course:
    time and frequency response of electric circuits
    AC steady-state circuit analysis, i.e. steady-state sinusoidal analysis
    single-phase and polyphase systems
    three-phase star-star and star-delta systems
    unbalanced four-wire and three-wire systems
    power computation and measurement in three-phase systems
    the use of graphical techniques such as phasors in AC analysis
    the response of systems to stored energy
    response of systems to sudden change (e.g. closing or opening of switches)
    circuits with controlled sources
    response of circuits to switched stimuli, including sinusoids
    use of transformations to simplify determination of circuit responses to input voltages
    Laplace transforms as a means of generalising DC and AC circuit analysis techniques
    signals and their properties ( e.g. average, RMS, piece-wise time description, singularity functions)
    application of the network functions
    characterisation and modeling of systems via their response to impulses and sinusoids
    the application of s-plane techniques, poles and zeros
    graphical techniques for predicting the shape of the frequency response (Bode plots)
    convolution integral as a means of determining the system response (analytical and graphical)
    systems with energy coupling (e.g. transformers)
    relating frequency and time response of a system
    analysis of two-port circuits
    frequency response of first and second-order filters, including analysis and construction
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Mid-semester Exam
    Intent:
    Provide timely feedback on student understanding of the basic concepts presented to in first six weeks.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2 and 3
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    B.1, B.2, C.1 and C.2
    Type: Mid-semester examination
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 30%
    Length:
    2 hours plus 10 minutes reading time
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Ability to build the governing mathematical equations of a given electrical circuit 20 1 C.1
    Correct solution of the mathematical model of a circuit using appropriate techniques 50 2, 3 B.1, C.2
    Correct design of circuit to achieve a desired objective, e.g. by correct determination of parameter values. 30 2, 3 B.2
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 2: Laboratory Assignments
    Intent:
    To assess students' understanding of the material covered in the laboratory sessions.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    4
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    B.1, B.2, B.5, C.3, E.1 and E.2
    Type: Laboratory/practical
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 20%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Correct pre-work analysis of circuit to be tested 20 4 B.1
    Correct determination of circuit components to meet design objectives 20 4 B.2, C.3
    Participation in group laboratory 0 4 E.1, E.2
    Correct build and test procedure of circuit 40 4 B.5
    Correct post-lab analysis of experimental results 20 4 C.3, E.1
    On time submission of assignment(s) 0 4 E.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 3: Final Exam
    Intent: To test students' understanding of the material.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2 and 3
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    B.1, B.2, C.1, C.2 and C.3
    Type: Examination
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 50%
    Length:
    3 hours plus 10 minutes reading time
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Ability to build the governing mathematical equations of a given electrical circuit 20 1 C.1
    Correct solution of the mathematical model of a circuit using appropriate techniques 50 2, 3 B.1, C.2, C.3
    Correct design of circuit to achieve a desired objective, e.g. by correct determination of parameter values. 30 2, 3 B.2
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Minimum requirements
    To pass the subject students need to obtain a mark of not less than 50% overall.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.