Fisheries Resources

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Fisheries Resources

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Biology, Life Sciences, Marine Biology

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    91123 Biocomplexity

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Description
    In this subject students learn about the biology of freshwater, estuarine and marine biological resources in relation to their exploitation by humans. Problems of productivity against a background of regulations, fishing methods and climate change are explored, and the major management requirements for ecologically sustainable development of coastal and freshwater fisheries resources are addressed. NSW and Australian practices are examined in relation to best practices elsewhere. Some classes are taught in excursion mode, as well as workshops with fisheries professionals.
    Subject objectives
    Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
    1. the taxonomy and basic ecology of key marine fish resources key field survey methods for fish stock assessment
    2. key lab techniques and data interpretation for fish stock assessment
    3. modeling techniques and interpretation for fish stock assessment and management. Issues and conflicts in fishery management
    4. how to apply for positions in relevant Industry, through completion of job application and mock job interview
    This subject also contributes specifically to the development of following course intended learning outcomes:
    An understanding of the nature, practice and application of the chosen science discipline. (1.0)
    Encompasses problem solving, critical thinking and analysis attributes and an understanding of the scientific method knowledge acquisition. (2.0)
    The ability to acquire, develop, employ and integrate a range of technical, practical and professional skills, in appropriate and ethical ways within a professional context, autonomously and collaboratively and across a range of disciplinary and professional areas, e.g. time management skills, personal organisation skills, teamwork skills, computing skills, laboratory skills, data handling, quantitative and graphical literacy skills. (3.0)
    The capacity to engage in reflection and learning beyond formal educational contexts that is based on the ability to make effective judgments about one's own work. The capacity to learn in and from new disciplines to enhance the application of scientific knowledge and skills in professional contexts. (4.0)
    An awareness of the role of science within a global culture and willingness to contribute actively to the shaping of community views on complex issues where the methods and findings of science are relevant. (5.0)
    An understanding of the different forms of communication - writing, reading, speaking, listening -, including visual and graphical, within science and beyond and the ability to apply these appropriately and effectively for different audiences. (6.0)
    Contribution to the development of graduate attributes
    1. Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application
    To effectively manage marine biological resources, we need to understand the multiplicity of amazing life histories and environmental interactions that are a backdrop to how we use these resources. A conceptual and hands-on practical understanding of key aspects of biology of exploited fish species and their ecosystems will be developed, enhanced through workshops with Industry experts, lectures and field and laboratory practical sessions and assessed through class reports and the final exam.
    2. An Enquiry-oriented approach
    The format of field classes, workshops and lectures will strongly encourage you to question and contribute their viewpoints throughout the subject. You will be shown how to develop the ability to follow lines of evidence from basic subject knowledge to inferences regarding the status and future of fish populations, through lectures, specific lab exercises and interactive session with Industry experts. Assessment will be through specific synthetic exam questions and a mock job interview which includes enquiry-oriented questions. Depth of enquiry also will be assessed through your critiques, which will require a review of a current relevant research paper that includes extensive evaluation and criticism of its content.
    3. Professional skills and their appropriate application
    You will develop interactive and teamwork skills during field and lab practical sessions, to enable you to analyse information critically and creatively. These skills will be assessed through team oral presentations (teams of 2) with class discussion and coordinator feedback and through a mock job interview process.
    Improving your personal, professional and intellectual development is encouraged and/or assessed through the:
    development of excellence in written scientific communication through the process of writing, being assessed and receiving feedback on 2 written reports.
    gathering, evaluating and use of information from sources such as databases, research and review articles, textbooks, catalogues and technical reference books through research for the assessed lab reports.
    ability to learn from and interact with Industry personnel in workshop situations.
    development and assessment of skills and confidence in producing a job application and attending a mock job interview for work in the appropriate Industry. Both these tasks will be assessed and feedback provided, which will greatly assist future employment endeavours.
    4. The ability to be a lifelong learner
    Fisheries are major ways people engage with their environment, and this subject has a strong focus on understanding the interaction between biological knowledge and sustainable human food resources, very topical in our current human-impacted environment. The complexity of this integration will be highlighted during Industry workshops with addresses by Fisheries scientists on linking management outcomes to science and societal needs. Throughout life, critically evaluating human impacts on the environment will be an important skill. Your understanding of this will be assessed through the critique, specific exam questions and questions in the mock job interview.
    5. Engagement with the needs of Society
    Knowledge of issues concerning the environment an dour interaction will become more important, and the skills learned in this subject will allow the student to play a more significant role in this key area of humanity. The job interview assessment task will quiz your ability to apply what you have learned to the benefits of society.
    Teaching and learning strategies
    This subject will be delivered by way of lectures, practical classes and Industry- participating workshops. In this Subject, 45% of the assessment will be practical-based and half will be based on theory learned in lectures, although information gleaned in prac situations will be fair game in the final exam.
    There will be 3 hours of lectures each week (usually delivered as 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour lecture each week). Practical classes will be run sporadically, as per timetable below, and include field trips and ½ day workshops off-campus. A workshop at Sydney Institute of Marine Science early in the Semester includes a non-compulsory overnight section (practical field sampling, careers lectures etc.) followed by a compulsory lecture and lab session during scheduled class time.
    Lecture outlines will be uploaded on UTSOnline prior to lectures. You will be expected to take notes during the lectures. Lecture material should be considered a guide to the information you are required to assimilate, rather than the sole content of the course. You are expected to obtain a deal of additional information to lectures, in the course of preparation of critiques and reports and from references and general reading around the topics.
    Content
    The subject will focus on developing the biological knowledge and skills necessary to evaluate fisheries sustainability, a prerequisite for someone embarking on a Fisheries biologist career. It therefore will include detailed knowledge of the taxonomy, biology and ecology of key fisheries species (fishes, invertebrates) across major habitats worldwide with an Australian focus. Key environmental factors such as oceanographic features, weather, climate change, local pollution and their role in maintaining fish populations will be evaluated, and best practice management including consumer-choice systems will be compared. A key feature will be workshops with Industry experts, including fisheries and marine park scientists, fishers themselves, and conservation workers. The skills developed during the course will enable the stud to develop a comprehensive job application and be interviewed for a mock position in a Fisheries department.
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Individual Report: SIMS Fish dissection workshop
    Intent:
    Complete lab proforma
    Expand knowledge adding relevant literature on fish digestive systems
    distil information into a concise report based on proforma, that comprehensively covers issues
    obtain appreciation of the role that fish play in healthy coastal ecosystem
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):
    1 and 2
    This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):
    1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0
    Type: Essay
    Groupwork: Group, group assessed
    Weight: 15%
    Assessment task 2: Scientific Paper Critique
    Intent:
    Ability to identify relevant scientific literature and to distill the messages.
    Work effectively with another student to present an oral summary of the paper and its strengths/weaknesses/relevance
    Respond to student questions
    Prepare a succinct critique
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):
    4
    This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):
    1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0
    Type: Report
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 15%
    Criteria:
    Assessment criteria for the critique and discussion will be based on succinct summary of main points of paper and distillation of its positives and negatives, and oral presentation. Detailed criteria will be available at the start of the Semester.
    Assessment task 3: Individual Report: Careel Bay seagrass fish assemble sampling
    Intent:
    Conduct field sampling to investigate fish assemblage structure in estuarine habitats
    Analyse data and determine species identity of fishes using biological keys. in the lab
    Expand knowledge adding relevant literature on fish digestive systems
    distil information into a concise report
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):
    1, 2, 3 and 4
    This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):
    1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0
    Type: Report
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 15%
    Criteria:
    Assessment criteria will be based on ability to seek rigorous scientific publications and to distil information, and to critically summaries knowledge and suggest avenues for improvement of management. Detailed criteria will be available at the start of the Semester.
    Assessment task 4: Job application/Interview
    Intent:
    to develop a professional-quality job application and CV, against provided selection criteria.
    To present for a short mock job interview and be quizzed on your suitability for he position
    To take away new insights into job seeking in this discipline and how you can improve
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):
    1, 2, 3 and 4
    This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):
    1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 15%
    Criteria:
    Criteria for assessing this task are the selection criteria, along with additional criteria based on conduct and communication in the interview. These criteria will be supplied earlier in the semester to allow suitable preparation for the task.
    Assessment task 5: Final Exam
    Intent:
    To assess your overall knowledge of key concepts in the subject
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):
    1 and 4
    This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):
    1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0
    Type: Examination
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 40%
    Criteria:
    Answers will be assessed for correctness!
    Minimum requirements
    Any assessment task worth 40% or more requires the student to gain at least 40% of the mark for that task. If 40% is not reached, an X grade fail may be awarded for the subject, irrespective of an overall mark greater than 50.
    In order to pass this subject, you must pass the final exam.
    You are expected to attend all lectures during the semester.
    You are expected to attend each prac and workshop. There is no opportunity to catch up if you miss a practical class.
    Required texts
    M. G. King (2007) Fisheries Biology: Assessment and Management 2nd Edition. Blackwell ISBN 978-1-4051-5831-2 (assigned text for subject- recommended buy!) Now available at the Coop Bookstore
    Recommended texts
    Malcolm Haddon (2001) Modelling and Quantitative Methods in Fisheries Chapman and Hall/CRC Press ISBN 1-58488-177-1 (in library closed reserve)
    Jennings M et al. (2003) Marine Fisheries Ecology Blackwell ISBN: 0-632-05098-5 (in library closed reserve)
    References
    Websites (more to come)
    http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries A wealth of info on NSW fisheries
    http://www.underwatertimes.com/ Great ot keep abreast of marine issues, esp. sensational ones!
    http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/aboutus/about/employment Getting a job at DPI
    http://www.afma.gov.au/ Australian Fisheries Management Authority
    http://www.affa.gov.au/ Australian Dept. of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
    http://www.cmar.csiro.au/ CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.