Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Engineering Science, Mechanical Engineering

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    48610 Introduction to Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering AND 68037 Physical Modelling AND 33130 Mathematical Modelling 1

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Description
    This subject builds on and brings together the concepts introduced in the Mathematical and Physical Modelling subjects and in Introduction to Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering. It is intended to provide students with a comprehensive overview of elementary mechanics and lay the basis for further work in this area in later subjects. In particular, material discussed in this subject is taken further in Machine Dynamics and Mechanics of Solids subjects in subsequent stages.
    Newtonian mechanics depends on the development of a series of increasingly complex models based on Newton?s Laws of Motion. The purpose of this modelling concept is to set up an orderly development that is conducive to mathematical analysis. The methodology relies on diagrammatically isolating a physical entity (or body) from all constraints or contacts with other bodies and replacing these contacts with external forces. This relies on discriminating between what are defined as internal and external forces. The mechanically isolated body is referred to as a free body diagram. It requires a graphical, diagrammatic or visual approach to problem analysis, unlike other analytical systems, which rely on more sophisticated mathematical analysis.
    The topics discussed in this subject include equilibrium in 2D plane and 3D space, force vectors, force system resultants, analysis of pin-connected trusses, characteristics of dry friction, equilibrium of rigid bodies subjected to frictional force, shear force and bending moment diagrams, kinematics and kinetics of a particle, rectilinear kinemtatics, curvilinear motion, force and acceleration, work and energy, impulse and momentum, and the relationships between them. These comprise the basis of a comprehensive course in Newtonian mechanics.
    Subject objectives
    Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
    1. Apply Newtonian mechanics, which is one of the fundamental sciences underlying engineering practice;
    2. Draw the Free-Body Diagrams, evaluate the force systems, and understand the modelling concept, as applied to Newtonian mechanics;
    3. Apply principles of particle mechanics and its limitations;
    4. Apply basic engineering concepts such as equilibrium, force and acceleration, work, energy and power, impulse and momentum, and the relationships between them;
    5. Apply the analytical skills in statics, dynamics and mechanics;
    6. Apply Free-Body-Diagrams, frames and machines, structural analysis, dry friction and frictional force, stress resultants, kinematics and dynamics of plane motion, work, energy and power, linear impulse and momentum, conservation of momentum, impact.
    This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    Apply systems thinking to understand complex system behaviour including interactions between components and with other systems (social, cultural, legislative, environmental, business etc.) [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.5 ] (A.5)
    Identify and apply relevant problem solving methodologies [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (B.1)
    Synthesise alternative/innovative solutions, concepts and procedures [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.1, 3.3] (B.3)
    Develop models using appropriate tools such as computer software, laboratory equipment and other devices [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.2,2.3, 2.4] (C.2)
    Evaluate model applicability, accuracy and limitations [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.1,2.2] (C.3)
    Communicate effectively in ways appropriate to the discipline, audience and purpose [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.2] (E.1)
    Teaching and learning strategies
    The teaching and learning approaches consist of a series of lectures and tutorials with emphasis on self-study. The students will be guided and assisted to reach the learning objectives a series of milestones strategically set throughout the semester. Six quizzes will be arranged during the semester to consolidate students? learning.
    This subject includes one lecture session of 1.5 hours and one tutorial session of 1.5 hours per week throughout the semester.
    This subject is a typical 6cp subject and therefore assumes a total time commitment (including class time) of approximately 150 hours, i.e. roughly 10 hours per week, for an average student aiming to pass the subject.
    In each topic, students will be given a set of engineering mechanics problems (including problems discussed in lectures and tutorials and problems for student self-learning) with answers. Those problems and their answers will be made available on UTS-Online/handouts. Students are expected to use these problems to help them learn engineering mechanics and kinematics.
    Content
    The topics to be covered in 14 lectures are:
    ? Force vectors and force system resultants;
    ? Equilibrium of rigid bodies in 2D and 3D;
    ? Free-body diagrams;
    ? Two- and three-force members;
    ? Frames and machines;
    ? Pin-connected trusses. Method of Joints and Method of Sections;
    ? Characteristics of dry friction. Equilibrium problems involving dry friction;
    ? Internal loadins - axial force, shear force, and bending moment;
    ? Shear force and bending moment diagrams;
    ? Kinematics of a particle. Rectilinear kinematics. Curvilinear motion;
    ? Absolute dependent motion analysis of two particles;
    ? Relative-motion of two particles using translating axes;
    ? Kinetics of a particle. Newton's Second Law of Motion. Equations of motion under different coordinate systems;
    ? Principle of work and energy. Conservation of energy;
    ? Principle of linear impulse and momentum;
    ? Conservation of linear momentum for a system of particles; and
    ? Impact.
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Five in-Class Quizzes
    Intent:
    Five quizzes aim to develop students? understanding of the principles of fundamental Newtonian mechanics, and students? ability to apply the FBD concept with confidence. The other associated aims are to build students? academic foundation of professional engineering education and develop their professional communication skills.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    , 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.5, B.1, B.3, C.2, C.3 and E.1
    Type: Quiz/test
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 50%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Correct use of diagrammatic modelling techniques including Free-Body Diagrams and kinetic diagrams 20 2 B.1, C.2
    Accuracy of application of theoretical knowledge, principles, concepts and procedures addressed in Newtonian mechanics 30 1, 3 B.1, C.2, C.3
    Effective and logical development of system thinking ability and problem solving skills as well as analytical skills in engineering mechanics including statics, dynamics and mechanics. 20 3, 4, 5 A.5, B.1, B.3
    Integration of concepts in Newtonian mechanics 20 3, 4, 5 A.5, C.3
    Clarity of presentations and good quality of detail and refinement. 10 4 E.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 2: Final Exam
    Intent:
    The aim of final exam is to provide students with a comprehensive overview of elementary mechanics including statics, mechanics of materials and dynamics. The other aim is to lay the basis for further study in this area in later subjects.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    , 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.5, B.1, B.3, C.2, C.3 and E.1
    Type: Examination
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 50%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Correct use and evaluation of diagrammatic modelling techniques including Free-Body Diagrams and kinetic diagrams 30 1, 2 B.1, C.2, C.3
    Effective development of system thinking ability and problem solving skills 30 3, 4 A.5, B.1, B.3
    Depth of analysis, technical proficiency and accuracy of representation of the knowledge in Newtonian mechanics, principles of particle mechanics, and dynamics of particles 30 1, 3, 4, 5 B.1, C.2, C.3
    Completeness of explanation, overall quality of presentation and clarity of communication 10 4 E.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Minimum requirements
    A pass in this subject is 50% provided the following conditions are met:
    ? a reasonable attempt has been made at all quizzes
    ? a mark of at least 45% of the final exam is obtained.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.