Hydraulics and Hydrology

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Hydraulics and Hydrology

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Civil Engineering, Engineering Science, Environmental Engineering

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    48641 Fluid Mechanics

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Description
    The objective of this subject is to give students a knowledge of open channel hydraulics and hydrology, leading to understanding of the scientific foundations and basic principles of these fields, and the ability to apply hydraulic and hydrological methods to engineering applications in an integrated way. Knowledge of fluid mechanics is consolidated and problem-solving skills in dealing with water engineering tasks are acquired. Topics include: open channel hydraulics ? types of flow (e.g. steady, uniform), friction equations, rapidly-varied flow, continuity, energy and momentum conservation, gradually varied flow, water surface profiles, software packages, hydraulic structures (channel appurtenances, culverts, bridge waterways); hydrology ? the hydrological cycle, water balances, meteorology and climatology, data collection, statistics, hydrological models, design rainfalls, rainfall-runoff processes, flood estimation models and procedures, software packages, yield analysis, groundwater, environmental hydrology; and integration of hydraulics and hydrology case studies.
    Subject objectives
    Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
    1. Comprehend open channel hydraulics and hydrology
    2. Identify the scientific foundations and basic principles of these fields
    3. Apply hydraulic and hydrological methods to engineering applications in an integrated way
    4. Explain engineering hydrology, distribution and properties of the waters of the earth, in the atmosphere, on the surface of the land, and underground
    5. Identify the interrelation of hydrology with earth sciences and geology
    6. Show an expanded knowledge of fluid flow principles, and proficiency in solving problems and performing design calculations for open channel flow systems
    7. Develop skills to solve the critical problems associated with increasing demands for water and diminishing resources
    8. Interpret fundamental issues involved in handling environmental problems such as climate change, flow processes and transport of pollutants in streams and groundwater systems and the impacts on ecosystems in receiving waters
    9. Utilise mathematical modelling used in hydraulics and hydrology
    This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    Identify constraints, uncertainties and risks of the system (social, cultural, legislative, environmental, business etc.) [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (A.3)
    Apply principles of sustainability to create viable systems [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.5, 1.6, 2.3, 2.4] (A.4)
    Apply systems thinking to understand complex system behaviour including interactions between components and with other systems (social, cultural, legislative, environmental, business etc.) [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.5 ] (A.5)
    Identify and apply relevant problem solving methodologies [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (B.1)
    Design components, systems and/or processes to meet required specifications [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.3, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (B.2)
    Implement and test solutions [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.2, 2.3,] (B.5)
    Demonstrate research skills [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.4, 2.1] (B.6)
    Apply abstraction, mathematics and/or discipline fundamentals to analysis, design and operation [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2] (C.1)
    Develop models using appropriate tools such as computer software, laboratory equipment and other devices [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.2,2.3, 2.4] (C.2)
    Evaluate model applicability, accuracy and limitations [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.1,2.2] (C.3)
    Manage own time and processes effectively by prioritising competing demands to achieve personal goals [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.5, 3.6] (D.1)
    Reflect on personal and professional experience to engage independent development beyond formal education for lifelong learning [EA Stage 1 Competency:3.3, 3.5] (D.2)
    Communicate effectively in ways appropriate to the discipline, audience and purpose [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.2] (E.1)
    Work as an effective member or leader of diverse teams within a multi-level, multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural setting [EA Stage 1 Competency:2.4, 3.2, 3.6] (E.2)
    Be able to conduct critical self-review and performance evaluation against appropriate criteria as a primary means of tracking personal development needs and achievements [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.5 ] (F.1)
    Teaching and learning strategies
    The overall structure of the subject involves two meetings of 2 hours weekly. Each session comprises of lecture and tutorial. There will also be computer and experimental laboratories. Students will be encouraged to be interactive on all aspects of the course of instruction, which will include the use of power-point presentations and selected videos. The lectures will have a practical bias.
    LECTURES
    Lecture notes, laboratory information sheets, assignments, etc will be placed on UTSonline. Each 2 hour block is divided into approximately 1.5 hours of lecture and 0.5 hours of tutorial.
    HYDRAULICS LABORATORY
    Laboratory sessions will be held in the Hydraulics Laboratory (Room 114, Level 1, Building 2). All students who use the laboratory will be shown a set of Environmental Health and Safety Regulations, which must be read and then adhered to at all times. Repeat students not wishing to perform the Laboratory may be exempted but only if their respective previous Laboratory Report had received 60% or more. Should students wish to apply for exemptions they must do so within the first three weeks so that marks may be verified and exemptions granted before scheduled laboratory sessions begin. Students may not submit a laboratory report unless they have attended the allocated laboratory session
    COMPUTER LABORATORY
    Students will be taught to use HEC-RAS.
    Content
    Meteorology and Meteorological Data, Climatology, Hydrological Data, Statistical Analysis in Hydrology, Hydrological Models, Rainfall Losses, Surface Runoff, Estimation of Design Flows, Unit Hydrographs, Yield Analysis, Evaporation, Groundwater, Energy Principles for Open Channel Flow, Critical Flow and Froude Number, Conservation of Momentum, Uniform and Non-Uniform Flow, Gradually Varied Steady Flow Analysis, HEC-RAS and Mike-11 Steady Flow Modelling, MIKE11 - Unsteady Flow Modelling.
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: One laboratory practicals
    Intent: To understand the nature of open channel flows and to relate the theories of conservation of fluid energy and momentum to actual flow behaviour
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1 and 6
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    B.1, B.5, B.6, D.1, E.1 and E.2
    Type: Laboratory/practical
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 10%
    Length:
    Students must first attend the lab to collect the data before they can write and submit the report. The report will be judged on its presentation as well as its technical contents. Raw data and final results must be neatly tabulated. Graphs and diagrams must be properly drawn, not free-hand sketched. Label, legend and caption must be provided for all the tables and figures. Discussion of results is considered the most important part of the report. Comparison of results with theoretical principles and/or with other experimental studies and comments on the sources of errors and difficulties encountered during the experiment are to be discussed. Conclusions are finally drawn from the important points which have been discussed.
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Attend one entire Laboratory class 17 1, 6 D.1, E.2
    Accurate collection of data 17 1, 6 D.1, E.2
    Analysis of data 17 1, 6 B.1, B.6
    Overall quality of report presentation (spelling, grammar, structure, cover sheet, table of contents, references and clarity which their diagrams or models convey) 17 1, 6 B.6, E.1
    Comparison with theory 17 1, 6 B.1, B.5, B.6
    Sources of error 15 1, 6 B.1, B.5, B.6
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 2: Assignments
    Intent: To demonstrate understanding and ability to communicate ideas and knowledge.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.3, A.4, A.5, B.1, B.2, B.5, B.6, C.1, C.2, C.3, D.2 and E.1
    Type: Report
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 20%
    Length:
    NA - calculation based.
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Detailed analysis 25 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 A.3, A.4, A.5, B.1, B.2, B.5, B.6
    Undertaking a complete Design calculation correctly 25 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 A.3, A.4, A.5, B.1, B.2, B.5, B.6
    Computer modelling or simulation of a mathematical process 25 3, 9 C.1, C.2, C.3, D.2
    Overall quality of report presentation (spelling, grammar, structure, cover sheet, table of contents, references and clarity which their diagrams or models convey) 25 3, 6, 7, 8 E.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 3: Mid-semester Quiz Mid-semester Quiz
    Intent: To test student understanding of the subject
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.3, A.4, A.5, B.1, B.2, B.5, B.6, C.1, C.2, C.3 and E.1
    Type: Mid-semester examination
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 20%
    Length:
    NA
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Detailed calculation and design 50 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 A.3, A.4, A.5, B.1, B.2, B.5, B.6, C.1, C.2, C.3, E.1
    Explanation of hydraulic and hydrological processes 50 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 A.3, A.4, A.5, B.1, B.2, B.5, B.6, C.1, C.2, C.3
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 4: Final Exam
    Intent: To test student understanding of the subject
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.3, A.4, A.5, B.1, B.2, B.5, B.6, C.1, C.2, C.3, D.2, E.1 and F.1
    Type: Examination
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 50%
    Length:
    NA unless specified by question
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Detailed calculation and design 50 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 A.3, A.4, A.5, B.1, B.2, B.5, B.6, C.1, C.2, C.3, D.2, E.1, F.1
    Explanation of hydraulic and hydrological processes 50 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 A.3, A.4, A.5, B.1, B.2, B.5, B.6, C.1, C.2, C.3, D.2, E.1, F.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Minimum requirements
    Students must pass each individual component. A satisfactory result must be obtained in "all" of the above sections. The passing mark for the subject is 50%

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.