Indigenous Rights

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Indigenous Rights

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Communication, Indigenous Studies, International Affairs, International Politics, International Relations, International Studies, Multicultural Studies

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    58227 Balancing World Views: Introduction to Aboriginal Cultures

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    8
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    5
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    7
  • Overview

    Description
    In this subject students learn the normative and legal bases for the protection of Indigenous rights. The objective is not only to understand the legal and political language of Indigenous rights with a view to engaging in the advocacy and debates that promote those rights but also to think critically about these ideas and institutions. Areas investigated include comparative studies of Australian and international cases such as cultural rights, land rights and native title rights and legislation, rights and institutions of self-government, Indigenous land use agreements and joint management strategies, and economic enterprise and social development frameworks and practices.
    Subject objectives
    a. Discuss the issues involved in debates about Indigenous peoples' rights
    b. Analyse the legal, normative and empirical dimensions of various philosophical and policy approaches to Indigenous rights
    c. Evaluate approaches using comparative perspectives
    d. Analyse cases and issues using evidence and argument
    e. Incorporate Indigenous peoples? perspectives and understandings of their rights and interests
    Teaching and learning strategies
    This subject consists of a weekly lecture and seminar over 13 weeks. Core texts are reproduced in a set of online readings accessible via the subject?s Blackboard site. The lectures scope the historical and current development of legal and political argument concerning Indigenous rights across a range of colonial and (currently) postcolonial contexts. Seminars involve students in a variety of activities including discussion groups, non-traditional group presentations as well as formal debates. The aim of each seminar is to provide students with the opportunity to articulate questions, ideas and arguments in relation to the contested nature of Indigenous rights and to develop the communication skills necessary for effective application of evidence and argument.
    Content
    This subject explores contestation around Indigenous rights within four broad themes:
    1.?DISCOVERY? AND DISPOSSESSION
    Europe?s first encounters with the world?s First Peoples
    Dispossession and international law
    2. RECOVERING RIGHTS: LAND, SOVEREIGNTY & SELF-DETERMINATION
    The UN human rights regime
    Land and culture: recovering rights
    Self-determination: from sovereignty to governance
    3. JUSTICE AND REPARATIONS
    Historic injustice & collective responsibility: genocide & ethnocide
    Social justice as reparations: welfare and economic development
    4. DEALING WITH DIFFERENCE: THE POLITICS OF INDIGENEITY & IDENTITY
    Political community and difference
    Indigenism, ethnicity and the state
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Critical Review of Texts
    Objective(s):
    b, d and e
    Weight: 40%
    Length: 2,000 words
    Criteria:
    Relevance issues, ideas and arguments are identified
    Depth of engagement with issues, ideas and arguments
    Coherence of reflection and analysis
    Originality of analysis
    Respect for Indigenous peoples? rights claims
    Assessment task 2: Draft Policy Brief
    Objective(s):
    a, b, c, d and e
    Weight: 20%
    Length: 1,000 words
    Criteria:
    Clarity of identified issues, ideas, arguments and stakeholder positions
    Depth of analysis
    Relevance of discussion of history and sources
    Applicability of constraints and opportunities
    Relevance and extensiveness of sources
    Respect for Indigenous peoples? rights claims
    Assessment task 3: Policy Brief
    Objective(s):
    a, b, c, d and e
    Weight: 40%
    Length: 2,000 (NB: 1,000 words of this assessment will have been completed in the first draft version of the policy brief - i.e., Assessment 2).
    Criteria:
    Depth with which issues, ideas, arguments and stakeholder positions are analysed
    Relevance of historical factors and sources
    Applicability of constraints and opportunities
    Relevance and extensiveness of sources
    Effectiveness of advocacy of Indigenous peoples? rights

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.