Introduction to Electrical Engineering

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Introduction to Electrical Engineering

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Electrical Engineering, Engineering Science

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Description
    The subject material is organised around two modules.
    In Module 1 (The Basics) basic electrical concepts such as voltage, current, resistance and power are introduced; simple circuit analysis techniques for DC and AC circuits are studied; and an analysis of the types, properties and functions of components commonly found in a linear DC power supply is used as an application of this basic knowledge. The practical aspects of this module include learning how to use basic equipment such as a multimeter and digital storage oscilloscope (DSO), learning some simple 'tinkering' skills, and building and testing of simple circuits.
    In Module 2 (Signals in Electrical Engineering) an application called the Filter Challenge is used to provide a context for presentation of material related to time and frequency domain representation of electrical signals including Bode plots and simple first-order RC filters.
    Subject objectives
    Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
    1. Use basic equipment such as a multimeter and digital storage oscilloscope (DSO)
    2. Use some simple 'tinkering' skills, and building and testing of simple circuits.
    3. Appreciate general application of electrical engineering concepts in daily life
    4. Apply fundamental mathematical concepts to problems related to basic electrical circuits
    5. Recognise, define and correctly use basic electrical technical terms such as voltage, current, power, phase, impedence, reactance, filtering, etc.
    6. Recognise fundamental design principles of electrical circuits and be able to use in solving simple design problems incorporating a range of concepts
    7. Demonstrate competence in using basic laboratory equipment and soldering skills
    8. Use basic AC and DC circuit analysis laws and methods
    This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    Apply systems thinking to understand complex system behaviour including interactions between components and with other systems (social, cultural, legislative, environmental, business etc.) [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.5 ] (A.5)
    Identify and apply relevant problem solving methodologies [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (B.1)
    Design components, systems and/or processes to meet required specifications [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.3, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (B.2)
    Apply decision making methodologies to evaluate solutions for efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.2, 2.1] (B.4)
    Implement and test solutions [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.2, 2.3,] (B.5)
    Apply abstraction, mathematics and/or discipline fundamentals to analysis, design and operation [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2] (C.1)
    Develop models using appropriate tools such as computer software, laboratory equipment and other devices [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.2,2.3, 2.4] (C.2)
    Reflect on personal and professional experience to engage independent development beyond formal education for lifelong learning [EA Stage 1 Competency:3.3, 3.5] (D.2)
    Communicate effectively in ways appropriate to the discipline, audience and purpose [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.2] (E.1)
    Teaching and learning strategies
    Student learning is enhanced by attendance at 1.5 hours of lectures per week, 1 hour of tutorials and participation in 3 hours of laboratory work per week.
    In addition to this, an average student is expected to spend 3-4 hours per week in activities which will support their learning. This may include reading of textbook and lecture notes, attempting tutorial problems, practice at using laboratory equipment, preparing for assessment items.
    As an indication, this subject would normally assume a total time commitment (including class time) of approximately 150 hours, for an average student aiming to pass the subject. This means 9-10 hours per week for the 14 week semester plus study for the final exam.
    Lectures (weekly details in Schedule of Content and Assessment)
    Lectures (1.5 hours each week) are formatted to help emphasise key learning outcomes from the weekly topic material. Most lecture sessions include examples of applications of the material presented, as well as demonstrations of practical work that students are expected to undertake during the laboratory sessions.
    All important announcements are made at the lecture sessions and placed in the ?Announcements? section of the UTSOnline site.
    Students should read the prescribed text to obtain much deeper understanding of the concepts/material presented in lectures provide more details of the material presented in lectures.
    Tutorials (weekly details in Schedule of Content and Assessment)
    Each student will attend a 1 hour tutorial each week. Attendance at tutorials is compulsory.
    Tutorials are an opportunity for students to apply some of the material presented in lectures and to ask questions about problems or concepts they have difficulties with. After attending the lectures and reading the relevant sections from the prescribed text book, students should attempt the recommended problems from the textbook and any other relevant problems prior to attending the tutorial.
    This requires a commitment from students to work BEFORE coming to a tutorial as well as staying focussed during the tutorial time to attempt and solve some of the problems.
    Students should use the worked examples in the textbook to provide a model for the type of approach needed to solve a problem. Their tutors may also work through some selected problems to emphasise the sort of thinking that would help students to solve a problem.
    Laboratories (weekly details in Schedule of Content and Assessment)
    There is a strong emphasis in this subject on laboratory work with half of the contact time being spent in the laboratory. Attending and completing all laboratory tasks within prescribed time is compulsory.
    ? All Laboratory tasks including the attendance to the lab sessions is compulsory. Students who are more than 25 minutes late at the start of a laboratory session will be considered absent for assessment purposes. Students must complete all pre-work before entering the lab and are required to enter all results and analysis for each laboratory experiment. The students must complete the lab tasks within the prescribed laboratory time to get FULL CREDIT. Students who cannot complete the labs within the prescribed laboratory time will only attract PARTIAL CREDIT. At the completion of each lab session, a lab supervisor will sign your Laboratory Notes to verify your attendance. It is student?s responsibility to ensure that the lab report at the end of each session is signed and marked by a lab supervisor, which also forms the record of lab attendance. The work that students have completed is neither satisfactory nor the students have completed the laboratory tasks, and then only partial credit will be given for the laboratory session. Feedback on the appropriateness of the laboratory work will be provided by your lab supervisor.
    The lab supervisors have been instructed not to sign loose pieces of paper or blank pages, so please do not ask them to do this.
    ? Read the laboratory notes before coming to the class. This is important because some of the laboratories require student to bring additional material to the laboratory or do calculations etc. prior to the lab.
    ? Bring the required materials with you to the lab session. Turning up to the lab without your Laboratory and Essential Notes or any additional necessary material and not being prepared will make it difficult for you to complete the labs.
    ? You will be expected to work in pairs using the workstation allocated to you. Groups of three or more students will not be allowed.
    ? Practical competence will be assessed during two Laboratory Tests. During laboratory classes you will be expected to develop skills in the use of the equipment and to demonstrate a minimum level of competence. Development of these skills will be necessary for future subjects and may also be useful in your industrial experience. This requirement is in line with the course philosophy of ?practice-based engineering?.
    ? Completion of Laboratory work: If students are unable to complete the laboratory Practical tasks within each laboratory session, they are expected to complete them in their own time at workshop located near the Faculty Learning Precinct (FLP) prior to the next laboratory class. Equipment (including connecting cables etc.- borrow from the reception area in FLP) available at this workshop will allow students to practice on the laboratory equipement at their own time. However, neither extra credit nor supervision will be offered to students who chose to complete their labs outside the prescribed laboratory session.
    At the end of each lab (starting from Lab 2), students need to take a short multiple choice online lab quiz. Online lab quizzes help to assess the understanding of the electrical concepts behind each lab and working of lab instruments. Further, they can help to make better links between theory and practice. To pass the subject, students must pass at least three online laboratory quizzes out of five. These online quizzes will be available on UTSOnline during certain time window to be advertised to the students well in advance. Students are allowed to take these online quizzes only during the advertised time window. They can access UTSOnline remotely for taking these quizzes. No alternate quizzes will be provided.
    Content
    The subject material is organised around 2 modules.
    In module 1 ?The Basics?, basic electrical concepts such as voltage, current, resistance, and power are introduced; simple circuit analysis techniques for DC and AC circuits are studied; and an analysis of the types, properties and functions of components commonly found in a linear DC power supply is used as an application of this basic knowledge. The practical aspects of this module include learning how to use basic equipment such as a multimeter and digital storage oscilloscope (DSO), learning some simple ?tinkering? skills, and building and testing a DC power supply.
    In module 2 ?Signals in Electrical Engineering?, an application called ?The Filter Challenge? is used to provide a context for presentation of material related to time and frequency domain representation of electrical signals including Bode plots, and simple first-order RC filters.
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Laboratory Practical Tests (Compulsory Assessment)
    Intent:
    To assess students on their minimum competence with their hands-on-knowledge and use of concepts, components, measuring equipment involved in the laboratory experiments.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.5, B.1, B.2, B.4, B.5 and E.1
    Type: Laboratory/practical
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 15%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Demonstration of accurate use of lab equipment 33 1, 6, 7 B.4, B.5, E.1
    Demonstration of accuracy of measurement 33 6, 7, 8 A.5, B.1, B.2, B.5
    Demonstration of accuracy of calculation 34 4, 5, 6 A.5, B.1, B.2
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 2: Laboratory Hands-on tasks (Compulsory Assessment)
    Intent:
    To help studentsacquire knowledge and skill of using laboratory instrumentation anddemonstrate the use of basic electronics and measurement apparatus to display, measure, and record results of simple laboratory experiments.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.5, B.1, B.2, B.4, B.5, D.2 and E.1
    Type: Laboratory/practical
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 10%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Use of basic Lab equipment 25 1, 7 B.4, B.5, E.1
    Use of simple electrical components 25 2, 3 B.1, B.2
    Calculation of results 25 4, 5 A.5, B.1, B.2
    Understanding of fundamental concepts 25 3, 4, 5 B.1, B.2, D.2, E.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 3: Mid-term Test
    Intent: Provide timely feedback on student understanding of the basic concepts presented to date
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    4, 5, 6 and 8
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    B.1, B.2, C.1, C.2 and D.2
    Type: Examination
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 15%
    Length:
    60 minutes
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Understanding of concepts 33 4, 5 C.1, D.2
    Accuracy of calculations 33 4, 5, 6, 8 B.1, B.2, C.1, C.2
    Use of mathematical models 34 4, 5, 6, 8 B.1, B.2, C.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 4: Final Examination
    Intent:
    The final exam aims to test understanidng of the students on the use of concepts learned in the lectures and tutorials throughout the semester.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    4, 5, 6 and 8
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    B.1, B.2, C.1, C.2 and D.2
    Type: Examination
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 50%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Understanding of concepts 33 4, 5 C.1, D.2
    Accuracy of calculations 33 4, 5, 6, 8 B.1, B.2, C.1, C.2
    Use of mathematical models 34 4, 5, 6, 8 B.1, B.2, C.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 5: Online Laboratory Quizzes (Compulsory Assessment)
    Intent:
    Online lab quizzes help to assess the understanding of the electrical concepts behind each lab and working of lab instruments. Further, they can help to make better links between theory and practice.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.5, B.1, B.2, B.4, B.5, D.2 and E.1
    Type: Quiz/test
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 10%
    Length:
    40 mins
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Use of basic Lab equipment 15 1, 7 B.4, B.5, E.1
    Use of simple electrical components 15 2, 3 B.1, B.2
    Calculation of results 35 4, 5 A.5, B.1, B.2
    Understanding of fundamental concepts 35 3, 4, 5 B.1, B.2, D.2, E.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Minimum requirements
    Compulsory Assessment Required to pass the subject:
    The Laboratory tasks are compulsory to obtain a pass or a higher grade in the subject. The compulsory assessment includes two lab tests, five lab quizzes and laboratory attendance. To pass the subject, each student must pass the compulsory lab assessment. To pass the compulsory lab assessment, students should:
    1) Attend and complete at least 4 labs out of total 6 labs;
    2) Pass at least one laboratory test out of two;
    3) Pass at least three laboratory quizzes out of five.
    If any or all of these conditions are not satisfied, students cannot pass this subject and will be awarded a Fail (X) grade for the subject irrespective of their marks in quizzes or final examination.
    Minimum Requirement to pass the subject:
    To pass the subject, one must pass the compulsory assessment as well as obtain the combined total weighted mark of >=50%.(from final exam, mid-term quiz, two lab tests, five lab quizzes and laboratory attendance)
    Students, who fail the compulsory assessment (Lab), will be awarded a Fail (X) grade for the subject irrespective of their marks in the quizzes or final examination.
    To obtain a pass or higher grade, your total weighted mark , i.e., (0.5 Final Exam + 0.15 Mid-term Quiz + 0.075 Lab Test 1 + 0.075 Lab Test 2 + 0.1 Lab attendance + 0.1 Lab quizzes))>= 50%. Students, who fail the compulsory assessment, will not be allowed to pass the subject irrespective of their marks in other assessments. They must repeat the subject in the following semester.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.