Signals and Systems

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Signals and Systems

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Electrical Engineering, Electronics Engineering, Engineering Science, Mechanical Engineering

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    48530 Circuit Analysis

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Description
    This subject presents the theoretical basis for system analysis and gives students skills in using the techniques to design components of real control/communication systems. The derivation of models from real-world devices through measurement and the comparison of model predictions with experimental results is emphasised in the laboratory component of the course. A group project that requires the design and implementation of part of a control/communication system allows students to apply their knowledge to a real-life problem. Topics include signal types and their representation in the time and frequency domains; modelling systems with differential or difference equations and transforms of the equations; signal operations and processing; the relationship between discrete and continuous quantities and the mathematical techniques applicable to each; the effects of feedback; time and frequency domain performance of systems; system stability; and control design techniques and simple communication systems. Through learning activities students also gain study skills, including academic literacy skills, and an appreciation of the different fields of practice of engineering and the interdisciplinary nature of engineering. Class time is used for lectures, tutorials, laboratories and project work. There are a number of formal laboratory sessions that apply control and communication theory, which also familiarise students with the laboratory equipment. The subject culminates in the design and implementation of a control system and communication system for a remote-controlled robot.
    Subject objectives
    Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
    1. Apply the mathematical tools associated with transform theory to the analysis and design of continuous-time and discrete-time systems.
    2. Analyse, design, simulate and test parts of a communication system and a control system in both the time-domain and frequency-domain.
    3. Model real and complex systems using a hierarchical approach, and be able to simplify them with appropriate assumptions.
    4. Measure time and frequency characteristics of signals and systems using appropriate laboratory equipment.
    5. Communicate technical ideas, decisions, calculations and experimental results in a written document.
    This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    Identify, interpret and analyse stakeholder needs [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.2, 2.3, 2.4] (A.1)
    Establish priorities and goals [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.3, 3.5] (A.2)
    Identify constraints, uncertainties and risks of the system (social, cultural, legislative, environmental, business etc.) [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (A.3)
    Apply systems thinking to understand complex system behaviour including interactions between components and with other systems (social, cultural, legislative, environmental, business etc.) [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.5 ] (A.5)
    Identify and apply relevant problem solving methodologies [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (B.1)
    Design components, systems and/or processes to meet required specifications [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.3, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (B.2)
    Synthesise alternative/innovative solutions, concepts and procedures [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.1, 3.3] (B.3)
    Implement and test solutions [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.2, 2.3,] (B.5)
    Demonstrate research skills [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.4, 2.1] (B.6)
    Apply abstraction, mathematics and/or discipline fundamentals to analysis, design and operation [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2] (C.1)
    Develop models using appropriate tools such as computer software, laboratory equipment and other devices [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.2,2.3, 2.4] (C.2)
    Evaluate model applicability, accuracy and limitations [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.1,2.2] (C.3)
    Manage own time and processes effectively by prioritising competing demands to achieve personal goals [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.5, 3.6] (D.1)
    Communicate effectively in ways appropriate to the discipline, audience and purpose [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.2] (E.1)
    Work as an effective member or leader of diverse teams within a multi-level, multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural setting [EA Stage 1 Competency:2.4, 3.2, 3.6] (E.2)
    Be able to conduct critical self-review and performance evaluation against appropriate criteria as a primary means of tracking personal development needs and achievements [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.5 ] (F.1)
    Teaching and learning strategies
    Class time is used for lectures, tutorials, laboratories and project work. There are a number of formal laboratory sessions that familiarise students with the laboratory equipment. Students then undertake a substantial group project that reinforces the theoretical content and culminates in a formal written presentation of their work. Students are required to attend all lectures and tutorial sessions. The class time is 6 hours a week with a similar amount of time required for independent study.
    Content
    The technical content of the subject aims to develop the theoretical basis for system analysis and gives students skills in using the techniques to design components of real control and communication systems. The derivation of models from real-world devices through measurement, and the comparison of model predictions with experimental results, is emphasised in the laboratory component of the course. Topics include: signals and systems representation in the time-domain, the Fourier series and transform, frequency-domain analysis, the Laplace transform, transfer functions, frequency response, time-domain response, feedback, the z-transform, discretization, system design, root locus and state variables. Skills in mathematical modelling, simulation and measurement techniques are developed through a series of laboratories. A group project in which students analyse, design and implement part of a control and communication system contextualises nearly all the technical content and makes use of the previously acquired laboratory and simulation skills. Three engineering themes permeate the subject. The first theme is the need for a systems perspective in engineering ? students need to mathematically model real systems using block diagrams and treat the blocks in a hierarchical manner. The second theme is related to the first in that students are expected to draw knowledge from a wide variety of sources ? previous subjects, industrial experience, new technology. The third theme is that of the need for engineers to take responsibility for their own professional development. Students produce a project report that details analysis of a set of specifications, design, simulation and testing as well as project management.
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Labs 1-5
    Intent: Skills in modelling and practical applications of signal theory.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3 and 4
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.5, B.1, B.2, B.3, B.5, C.1, C.2, C.3 and E.2
    Type: Laboratory/practical
    Groupwork: Group, group assessed
    Weight: 20%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Correct use of equipment settings and measurements 25 1, 2, 3, 4 A.5, B.1, B.5, E.2
    Correctness of the answer 25 1, 2, 3 A.5, B.1, E.2
    Correct model and simulation of signals and systems 25 1, 2, 3 A.5, C.1, C.2, C.3, E.2
    Synthesis of system based on specification 25 2 B.2, B.3, E.2
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 2: Mid-Semester Exam
    Intent: Test knowledge of continuous-time signals and systems.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2 and 3
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.5, B.1, B.2, B.3, C.1, C.2 and C.3
    Type: Mid-semester examination
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 20%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Application of theory 30 1, 2, 3 A.5, B.1, B.2, B.3, C.1, C.2, C.3
    Correctness of approach 30 1, 2, 3 A.5, B.1, B.2, B.3, C.1, C.2, C.3
    Application of methodology 30 1, 2, 3 A.5, B.1, B.2, B.3, C.1, C.2, C.3
    Correctness of the answer 10 1, 2, 3 A.5, B.1, B.2, B.3, C.1, C.2, C.3
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 3: Project
    Intent: To analyse a set of specifications, design, simulate, test and practically demonstrate a simple control scheme and a simple communication scheme.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.1, A.2, A.3, A.5, B.1, B.2, B.3, B.6, C.1, C.2, C.3, D.1, E.1 and F.1
    Type: Project
    Groupwork: Group, group and individually assessed
    Weight: 20%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Interpreting and evaluating a set of specifications 17 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 A.1, A.2, A.3, C.1, C.2, C.3
    Correct model of signals and systems 17 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 A.5, F.1
    Design and simulation of systems 17 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 B.2, B.3, C.3
    Quality of technical and visual representation of results 17 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 E.1
    Application of theory to practice 17 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 B.1, B.2, B.3, B.6, C.1, C.2
    Effectiveness of time management and independent learning 15 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 B.6, D.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 4: Final Exam
    Intent: Test knowledge of discrete-time systems, control systems and communication systems.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2 and 3
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.5, B.1, B.2, B.3, C.1, C.2 and C.3
    Type: Examination
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 40%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Application of theory 25 1, 2, 3 A.5, B.1, B.2, B.3, C.1, C.2, C.3
    Correctness of approach 25 1, 2, 3 A.5, B.1, B.2, B.3, C.1, C.2, C.3
    Application of methodology 25 1, 2, 3 A.5, B.1, B.2, B.3, C.1, C.2, C.3
    Correctness of the answer 25 1, 2, 3 A.5, B.1, B.2, B.3, C.1, C.2, C.3
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.