Architectural Design: Forming

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Architectural Design: Forming

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Architecture, Construction Management, Design Management, Graphic Design, Industrial Design

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    This unit of study is designed for architecture/design student majors

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Description
    This subject is the introductory studio in the Bachelor of Design in Architecture studio sequence. The subject provides the framework to learn essential techniques for the production of spaces as well as important strategies in critical and analytical thinking. Students gain an understanding of the design process; develop an understanding of our relationships to space, form, sequence and the environment; undergo rigorous research and analysis; and develop strategies for translating concepts into spatial solutions. The subject introduces students to diverse sources of architectural concepts, methodologies, principles and skills that comprise a common knowledge base critical to the practice of architecture, including those found in the history of architecture and from outside of architecture, for example, in nature, mathematics, the human body, the landscape and the environment. These sources are considered in terms of their formal appearance, performance in different conditions, cultural and historical associations, and potential for inventive development and transformation. Students are introduced to two- and three-dimensional thinking and exploration, composition and representation. Processes for the development of initial formal proposals for site and program-specific conditions are explored through orthographic drawing, three-dimensional modelling using appropriate software, sketches and scale models.
    Subject objectives
    On successful completion of this subject students will have achieved the following:
    1. become conversant with the methodology of the tutor-led Design Studio
    2. understand the development of design ideas through a responsive design process
    3. develop an understanding of scale as applied to an architectural proposition
    4. develop skills in three-dimensional form making using physical and virtual models
    5. apply knowledge and skills learned over the semester to respond to a briefed architectural design project as identified in the subject curriculum
    6. apply knowledge and skills learned in Architectural Communications to the presentation of submitted material.
    This subject also contributes to the faculty's five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (see 'Graduate Attribute Development') through the following course intended learning outcomes:
    Ability to take autonomous responsibility for actions and decisions (A.1)
    Ability to establish and develop an informed and ethical position toward social, technical and environmental practices (A.2)
    Ability to position work within an extended disciplinary context (A.3)
    Ability to work cooperatively and professionally as part of a team, initiate partnerships with others, take a leadership role when required, and constructively contribute to peer learning (C.1)
    Ability to communicate ideas effectively in a variety of ways including oral, written, visual, physical and digital (C.2)
    Ability to constructively engage with subject learning activities (C.3)
    Ability to develop innovative approaches (I.1)
    Ability to understand and challenge disciplinary conventions (I.2)
    Ability to initiate and execute meaningful self-directed iterative processes (I.3)
    Ability to produce inspirational responses that exemplify integration of learning experiences (I.4)
    Ability to innovatively use architectural technologies and materials (I.5)
    Ability to apply communication techniques, knowledge and understanding to practical applications in architecture (P.1)
    Ability to apply relevant digital and/or manual techniques and technologies to architectural practice (P.2)
    Ability to thoughtfully apply/deploy disciplinary learning in work, with a continuing commitment to personal professional development (P.3)
    Ability to source, evaluate and utilise appropriate academic and professional references (R.1)
    Ability to independently select and apply appropriate research methodologies to carry out investigative study (R.2)
    Ability to analyse, synthesise and formulate complex ideas, arguments and rationales and use initiative to explore alternatives (R.3)
    Ability to demonstrate knowledge of architectural precedent and to place architectural practice within a contextual framework (R.4)
    Ability to reflect and engage in self-critique and critical thinking (R.5)
    Teaching and learning strategies
    Weekly on campus: 1 hr lecture, 3 hr tutorial.
    Total: 4 hours per week
    The subject is structured around successive project-based design exercises. There will be regular one-hour illustrated lectures that introduce design theory and examples pertinent to the overarching themes and activities of the subject. The remaining three hours per week is structured as guided working sessions in the architecture studios or computer laboratories for drawing and making. These working sessions include participatory group discussion, using individual work as a means for group learning through discussion and critique. Students are expected to attend all lecture and studio sessions, and to follow the suggested progress patterns for each design project. Students are also encouraged to actively participate in the group discussions during the studio teaching.
    Content
    The content of this subject typically includes a series of project-based design exercises. These projects can take the format of short, fortnightly conceptual design exercises or longer, more conventional projects. The projects and lectures are focussed on architectural form; design processes, contemporary and historic architectural approaches.
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Ways of Seeing, Preliminary Investigative Exercises
    Objective(s):
    This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4 and 6
    This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):
    A.1, A.3, C.1, C.2, C.3, I.1, I.2, I.3, I.4, I.5, P.2, R.1, R.2, R.3, R.4 and R.5
    Type: Presentation
    Groupwork: Group, individually assessed
    Weight: 30%
    Assessment task 2: Organisation and Context, Design Development and Implementation
    Objective(s):
    This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6
    This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):
    A.1, A.2, A.3, C.2, C.3, I.1, I.2, I.3, I.4, I.5, P.1, P.2, R.2, R.3, R.4 and R.5
    Type: Presentation
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 55%
    Assessment task 3: Portfolio
    Objective(s):
    This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6
    This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):
    A.1, A.3, C.2, C.3, I.1, I.2, I.4, P.1, P.2, P.3, R.1, R.4 and R.5
    Type: Portfolio
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 15%

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.