Engineering Mechanics

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Engineering Mechanics

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Civil Engineering, Engineering Science, Environmental Engineering

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    33130c Mathematical Modelling 1 AND 68037c Physical Modelling

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Description
    The subject aims to assist students to acquire a fundamental understanding of static equilibrium concepts commonly used in analysis and design of engineered structures. It also aims to develop their skills to analyse simple structures such as statically determinate beams and trusses subjected to various loading and support conditions. On completion of this subject, students should be able to apply static equilibrium conditions as tools to analyse simple structures, and have developed an appreciation of design in civil engineering. The principles developed in this subject form the basis of structural analysis and design. It introduces students to the fundamental aspects that are a basis for subsequent fields of dynamics in civil engineering such as fluid mechanics, hydraulics and road design.
    Subject objectives
    Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
    1. Apply the concept of equilibrium to systems which can be modelled as particles in 2D, and to rigid bodies in 2D.
    2. Simplify and clarify mechanics problems using free body diagrams
    3. Analyse simple statically determinate structures such as beams, pin-jointed trusses and pin-jointed frames subject to various loadings and support conditions
    4. Determine internal actions in statically determinate structures and draw internal action diagrams ? Axial Force (AFD), Shear Force (SFD) and Bending Moment Diagrams (BMD) for these structures.
    5. Determine simple dynamic variables and solve simple dynamic problems involving kinematics, energy and momentum.
    This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    Identify and apply relevant problem solving methodologies [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (B.1)
    Apply abstraction, mathematics and/or discipline fundamentals to analysis, design and operation [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2] (C.1)
    Develop models using appropriate tools such as computer software, laboratory equipment and other devices [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.2,2.3, 2.4] (C.2)
    Manage own time and processes effectively by prioritising competing demands to achieve personal goals [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.5, 3.6] (D.1)
    Communicate effectively in ways appropriate to the discipline, audience and purpose [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.2] (E.1)
    Teaching and learning strategies
    Student learning in the subject is facilitated through one x two-hour lecture session and one x two-hour tutorial session each week. Students are expected to be punctual and regular in attending face-to-face sessions in this subject.
    Students are expected to read the indicated material and answer the associated online questions before the lecture so that lectures can focus on problem solving activities in small groups and the problematic material, rather than the parts that most people can understand by themselves.
    The tutorial sessions will consist mainly of problem-solving and discussion. Students are expected to attempt the tutorial questions before their scheduled tutorial.
    NOTE: As an indication, a typical 6 CP subject would normally assume a total time commitment (including class time) of approximately 150 hours, for an average students aiming to pass the subject).
    Content
    SI units and physical dimensions used in statics as the basis for structural analysis and design.
    Types of applied actions/loads.
    Forces, loads and their characteristics. Scalar and vector. Tributary areas or widths for area distributed applied loads.
    Principle of transmissibility.
    Rigid bodies.
    Applied moments and their characteristics. Varignon's theorem.
    Equivalent force/moment systems.
    Equilibrium of rigid bodies. Free-body diagrams (FBD).
    Two force and three force body.
    Pin-jointed trusses. Method of joints and method of sections.
    Internal actions ? axial, shear, moment.
    Analysis of beams. Shear force (SFD) and bending moment diagrams (BMD) of beams.
    Shear force and bending moment diagrams of simple frames.
    Fundamental concepts in dynamics such as kinematics of a particle, with equation of differential and integral calculus, conservation of energy and conservation of momentum.
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Four Assignments (Summative)
    Intent:
    To provide students with practice in problem solving & applying concepts to real or model structures.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    B.1, C.1, C.2 and E.1
    Type: Report
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 25%
    Length:
    Varies with each assignment.
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Reports are formatted as such, with appropriate referencing, discussion sections that include discussion of the relationships between the variables and errors involved in measurement and analysis of these, and recommendations 25 1, 3, 5 C.1, C.2, E.1
    free body diagrams are drawn clearly with all forces correctly calculated and labelled 25 2 B.1, C.2, E.1
    Internal action diagrams are drawn clearly with relevant values correctly calculated and labelled 25 4 E.1
    Problem solutions are clearly and accurately set out 25 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 B.1, C.1, E.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 2: Four Topic Quizzes (Formative)
    Intent:
    To allow students to demonstrate what they have learnt, to determine what they don?t know yet, and to learn it collaboratively with their peers. In addition each collaborative quiz will be followed by a review session where all questions, alternative answers and common misconceptions will be discussed.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    B.1, C.1, C.2, D.1 and E.1
    Type: Quiz/test
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: Mandatory task that does not contribute to subject mark
    Length:
    2 hour process consisting of first an individual quiz, then a collaborative quiz, then a review session.
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Diagrams clearly drawn with relevant values correctly labelled 33 2, 4 B.1, C.2, D.1, E.1
    Values calculated correctly 33 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 B.1, D.1, E.1
    Correct equations derived 34 1, 5 C.1, D.1, E.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 3: Final Exam - Stage 1 and Stage 2 (Summative)
    Intent:
    To allow students to demonstrate their knowledge of the concepts of mechanics and their skills in applying them to solve problems at the level appropriate to begin the subsequent subject,
    Mechanics of Solids.
    Stage 1 - The threshold exam is intended to provide assurance that students who passed 48321 have demonstrated satisfactory knowledge in all subject topics.
    To assist students in their learning an exam review will be held in week 14, where all questions, alternative answers and common misconceptions will be discussed. The intent is to help students identify and address gaps in their learning before sitting the Stage 2 exam. The temporal separation between the Stage I and Stage 2 exams is to allow students time for this revision and review to occur.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    B.1, C.1, C.2, D.1 and E.1
    Type: Examination
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 75%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Diagrams clearly drawn with relevant values correctly labelled 33 2, 4 B.1, C.2, D.1, E.1
    Values calculated correctly 33 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 B.1, D.1, E.1
    Correct equations derived 34 1, 5 C.1, D.1, E.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Minimum requirements
    In order to pass the subject, you must:
    ? achieve 75% or more in a free body diagram quiz; and
    ? achieve at least 50% in the assignments overall; and
    ? achieve a pass in the final examination; and
    ? achieve an overall total of 50 marks or more for the subject.
    Free Body Diagram Quiz requirement
    Free body diagrams have been identified as a vital concept to understand engineering mechanics, so students must earn 75% or more of the marks for the free body diagram quiz. Students that do not achieve 75% or more marks for the free body diagram quiz at their first attempt will be given two other opportunities during the semester to achieve the required mark (ie total of three attempts over the semester). Students who cannot demonstrate their understanding of free body diagrams to this level will not pass 48321 Engineering Mechanics.
    Multiple failures in this subject
    Engineering Mechanics is absolutely fundamental in Civil Engineering. The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering has decided that from 2009, this subject will act as a gateway for continuing in Civil Engineering. In particular, students who fail the subject repeatedly will not be permitted to re-enrol in the subject and hence such students will need to re-consider their future studies because the subject Engineering Mechanics acts as an initial pre-requisite subject for many of the subsequent Civil Field of Practice subjects.
    In particular, you are directed to University Rule 10.6 Repeated failure in a subject, which is accessible at http://www.gsu.uts.edu.au/rules/10-6.html . In particular, Rule 10.6.2 states that
    ?A student who fails a subject for a second time shall be advised that:
    1. he or she must seek advice from an appropriate adviser from the relevant faculty before being permitted to enrol again in that subject; and
    2. a third failure in the same subject will require the student to seek the permission of the Responsible Academic Officer for any further enrolment in that subject.?
    In particular, any student who fails this subject for the third (or more) time from Autumn Semester 2009 onwards will not be permitted to enrol in the subject again. Any currently enrolled student who has failed this subject two or more times prior to A2012 must contact the subject co-ordinator for advice, such as changing his/her study approach in the subject because the previous approach has not been successful, before participating in the subject for the final time.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.