Introduction to Computer Graphics (C++)

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Introduction to Computer Graphics (C++)

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Animation, Computer Science, Graphic Design, Information Sciences, Information Technologies

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    31080c Digital Multimedia AND 31251 Data

    Structures Requisite elaboration/waiver: students who have not completed 31251 Data Structures and Algorithms may apply for a prerequisite waiver if they are competent in C or C++ and Algorithms

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Description
    This subject provides a thorough introduction to the computer representation, manipulation and display of pictorial information. Topics covered include computer graphics hardware and software systems, graphics programming; mathematical tools for 2D and 3D graphics; 2D and 3D graphics algorithms; rendering algorithms; and application areas of computer graphics.
     
    Subject objectives
    Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
     
    1. Exemplify the major computer graphics application areas.
    2. Explain the operations of graphics hardware systems.
    3. Explain the viewing pipeline of generating a raster-scan image .
    4. Explain some classic 2D and 3D graphics algorithms.
    5. Create computer models of 2D and 3D objects using mathematical knowledge and skills.
    6. Implement the computer models using OpenGL and a high level program language.
    7. Document and communicate their research findings, design ideas, models, implementations and/or outcomes.
    8. Reflect on their own work effectively in writing
    This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
     
    Implement and test solutions (B.5)
    Apply abstraction, mathematics and/or discipline fundamentals to analysis, design and operation (C.1)
    Develop models using appropriate tools such as computer software, laboratory equipment and other devices (C.2)
    Manage own time and processes effectively by prioritising competing demands to achieve personal goals (Manage self) (D.1)
    Communicate effectively in ways appropriate to the discipline, audience and purpose. (E.1)
    Work as an effective member or leader of diverse teams within a multi-level, multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural setting (E.2)
    Be able to conduct critical self-review and performance evaluation against appropriate criteria as a primary means of tracking personal development needs and achievements (F.1)
    Teaching and learning strategies
    There are a one-and-half hour face-to-face lecture session and a one-and-half hour tutorial/lab session (starting from Week 1) each week. In the lecture sessions, the instructor will explain the designated topics, with complementary materials from other sources being used where necessary, and give demos for implementing algorithms or presenting some illustrative examples to help students understand the topics better.
     
    In the tutorial/lab sessions, students will work on some tasks related to the topics covered in the previous weeks with the help of a lab tutor. The tutor may give some demos for using software packages or some illustrative working examples.
     
    The Faculty of Engineering and IT expects students to attend 80% of all classes for all the enrolled subjects. For this subject, you are expected to attend no less than 80% of the lecture classes and 100% of tutorial/lab classes. Achievement of the objectives will be very difficult if you don't attend the classes regularly.
     
    Pursuant to UTS rule 2.5.1 students who do not satisfy attendance requirements may be refused permission by the Responsible Academic Officer to be considered for assessment for this subject.
     
    Content
    Overview of the main applications of computer graphics
    Graphics software standards
    Computer graphics hardware systems
    OpenGL
    2D / 3D viewing
    2D / 3D transformations
    3D object representations
    Spline representations
    Fractal-geometry methods
    Computer animation
    Illumination models and surface rendering methods
    Hidden lines and visible surfaces
    Texture mapping
    Colour models
    Algorithms for graphics primitives
    Input techniques
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Major CG Programming Assignment
    Intent:
    Assess students? ability (i) to use the OpenGL rendering pipeline, (ii) to apply mathematical skills (transformation techniques and 3D object representation techniques) to construct and control a 3D scene, and (iii) to program in C++.
     
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives:
     
    5, 6, 7 and 8
     
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
     
    B.5, C.1, C.2, E.1, E.2 and F.1
     
    Type: Project
    Groupwork: Group, group and individually assessed
    Weight: 40%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Understanding and correct use of object modeling techniques including the relevant mathematical technique (e.g. geometry and transformation) 20 5 C.1, C.2
    Correctness of implementation of models, including object models, color model and lighting model, in C++ with OpenGL 40 6 B.5
    Successful delivery of ideas and audience engagement 10 7 E.1
    Quality of visual graphic communication 20 7 C.2, E.1
    Contribution to team work (succinctness, courtesy, motivation, taking a fair share of the work) and effective communication and teamwork reflected in project development 5 8 E.2
    Depth and relevance of self-review and evidence of benchmarking 5 8 F.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 2: Knowledge Exam
    Intent:
    Assess students? theoretical and technical knowledge of computer graphics
     
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives:
     
    2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7
     
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
     
    B.5, C.1, C.2 and E.1
     
    Type: Examination
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 50%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Demonstrated knowledge of Computer Graphics and computing skills 100 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 B.5, C.1, C.2, E.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 3: Weekly lab tasks
    Intent:
    Offers opportunities for students to progressively apply CG knowledge, implement learned methods and develop C++ programming skills with OpenGL.
     
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives:
     
    3, 4, 5 and 6
     
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
     
    B.5, C.1, C.2 and D.1
     
    Type: Laboratory/practical
    Groupwork: Individual
    Weight: 10%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Participation 50 3, 4, 5, 6 D.1
    Quality of labwork 50 3, 4, 5, 6 B.5, C.1, C.2, D.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Minimum requirements
    In order to pass this subject, student must achieve the overall mark that is no less than 50/100.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.