Soil Behaviour

UTS

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Soil Behaviour

  • Host University

    UTS

  • Location

    Sydney, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Civil Engineering, Engineering Science, Environmental Engineering

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    48331c Mechanics of Solids

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Description
    The objective of this subject is to give a broad-based introduction to the geosciences and a more rigorous introduction to soil as an engineering material. The subject concludes with a detailed study of the problems of soil settlement and soil shear strength. At the completion of the subject students should: be familiar with the natural processes occurring on the surface of the earth; be able to communicate with geologists, earth scientists and others involved in studying the ground; understand the fundamentals of the behaviour of soil as an engineering material; be aware of those aspects of soil behaviour which have a significant environmental impact; be able to solve a range of soil-related problems, especially those involving water flow and soil settlement; and have a solid basis for further formal study and self-study in the geotechnical area. Topics include introduction to soil engineering ? typical problems, the engineer's role; geological fundamentals ? classification, composition and structure of rock, engineering properties; geomorphology ? soil formation, landforms; nature of soil ? particulate nature, classification, clay mineralogy; introduction to soil mechanics ? overview, state of vertical stress, effective stress; water in soil ? groundwater, seepage and permeability; soil environmental impacts ? problems, environmental behavioural aspects and properties; settlement of soils ? settlement theory, consolidation testing, 1D settlement estimation, elastic deformations, rate of settlement; and soil shear strength ? Mohr Coulomb failure law, strength testing, drained and undrained strength.
    Subject objectives
    Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
    1. Identify the natural processes occurring on the surface of the earth
    2. Communicate with geologists, earth scientists and others involved in studying the ground
    3. Describe the fundamentals of the behaviour of soil as an engineering material
    4. Recognise those aspects of soil behaviour which have a significant environmental impact
    5. Solve a range of soil-related problems, especially those involving water flow and soil settlement
    6. Illustrate a solid basis for further formal study and self-study in the geotechnical area
    This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    Identify, interpret and analyse stakeholder needs [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.2, 2.3, 2.4] (A.1)
    Identify and apply relevant problem solving methodologies [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (B.1)
    Design components, systems and/or processes to meet required specifications [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.3, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3] (B.2)
    Implement and test solutions [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.2, 2.3,] (B.5)
    Demonstrate research skills [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.4, 2.1] (B.6)
    Develop models using appropriate tools such as computer software, laboratory equipment and other devices [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.2,2.3, 2.4] (C.2)
    Evaluate model applicability, accuracy and limitations [EA Stage 1 Competency: 2.1,2.2] (C.3)
    Manage own time and processes effectively by prioritising competing demands to achieve personal goals [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.5, 3.6] (D.1)
    Reflect on personal and professional experience to engage independent development beyond formal education for lifelong learning [EA Stage 1 Competency:3.3, 3.5] (D.2)
    Communicate effectively in ways appropriate to the discipline, audience and purpose [EA Stage 1 Competency: 3.2] (E.1)
    Work as an effective member or leader of diverse teams within a multi-level, multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural setting [EA Stage 1 Competency:2.4, 3.2, 3.6] (E.2)
    Identify and apply relevant project management methodologies [EA Stage 1 Competency: 1.6, 2.2, 2.4] (E.3)
    Appreciate ethical implications of professional practice [EA Stage 1 Competency:3.1] (F.2)
    Be aware of global perspectives (needs, rules/regulations, and specifications) [EA Stage 1 Competency:1.5, 1.6, 2.1, 2.2 , 2.3, 3.6] (F.4)
    Teaching and learning strategies
    The lecture material explains the theory of soil behaviour while the understanding and application of such theories are developed through a variety of means. These will include the preparation of small written reports, the completion of a self-learning module and problem solving assignments. Where feasible, assignments are designed to encourage the students to work with a wide range of data inputs and to apply innovative thought. Limited hands-on laboratory testing and some demonstrations will be used to enhance the understanding of the course material. The class meets twice a week, the first meeting is a lecture while the second meeting is either a problem solving tutorial or a laboratory session.
    This subject includes 2.5 hours of lecture and 3 hours of tutorials/practicals each week. The course consists of two components, Soil Mechanics and Geology. The class will meet twice a week, on Tuesdays for lectures and on Wednesdays or Fridays for tutorials/practicals. The table on the next page sets out the schedule of classes and gives a brief outline of the material that will be covered. Lectures are supported by a printed handbook of lecture summaries and readings. You will gain most from the lectures if you read each week's material in advance. Students should expect to spend on average 3 to 4 hours per week on this subject in addition to actively participate in all the tutorials, laboratories and lectures.
    Content
    Introduction to soil engineering: typical problems, the engineer's role, the role of other professions in the study of the ground.
    Geological fundamentals: classification, composition and structure of rock, engineering properties of rock, introduction to rock mechanics.
    Geomorphology: rock weathering and soil formation, landform relationships.
    Nature of soil: particulate nature, classification, clay minerals.
    Introduction to soil mechanics: overview, phase relationships, soil compaction.
    Water in soil: groundwater flow, seepage, permeability, flow net.
    Stress analysis of soil: the effective stress principle, in-situ stresses, stresses due to loading.
    Settlement of soils: settlement and consolidation theories, 1D settlement estimation, rate of settlement.
    Shear strength of soil: Mohr Coulomb failure law, strength testing, drained and undrained failure.
    Assessment
    Assessment task 1: Soil Mechanics Assignments
    Intent:
    Classify, solve and formulate various problems, differentiate different types of solutions. Giving the students further chance to practice various topics related to soil mechanics and evaluate them.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.1, B.1, B.6, C.2, D.1, E.1 and F.4
    Weight: 10%
    Criteria:
    Soil Mechanics assignments includes 9 sets.
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Correctness of Calculation 30 5 A.1, B.1
    Correct use of units and significant figures 10 2 E.1
    Conjecturing alternatives 10 1, 4 B.6
    Clarity of drawings and sketches 10 2 C.2
    Systematic thinking 15 3 D.1
    Validity of presented solution or design 15 3, 6 C.2, F.4
    Punctuality and quality of written report 10 2 E.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 2: Mid-Session Exam
    Intent:
    Strengthen analysing skills and problem solving techniques; identify students? issues in analysis and technical communication, apply corrective measure and give students appropriate feedback; and keeping the students up to date with the lectures.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.1, B.1, B.2, C.3, D.1 and E.1
    Weight: 20%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Application of theory and methodology 20 1, 4 A.1, B.1
    Functionality of design 10 3 B.2
    Validity of justification for the design 10 5 C.3
    Application of analysis 10 5 A.1
    Judgement application within the limited time 10 5 B.1, D.1
    Identify the problem and Justification of solution 20 1, 2 D.1, E.1
    Correctness of decision making within the limited time 10 1 C.3, D.1
    Correctness of system modelling 10 2, 6 B.2
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 3: Practicals, Lab and Site Visit Reports
    Intent:
    Identifying sources of uncertainties and errors in soil testing and site investigations, strengthening statistical analysis and writing skills; organising teams to conduct laboratory tests, and geological mapping; Providing the students with hand-on experience and familiarising them with real life problems. Give the students hand-on experience and familiarise them with real life problems. Give the students hand-on experience and familiarise them with real life problems
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.1, B.1, B.5, B.6, C.3, D.1, E.1, E.2 and F.4
    Weight: 5%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Completeness of Interpretation and Discussion of result 25 1 A.1, B.1
    Judgement of experimental data and its limitation 25 3 B.5, C.3
    Linkage to practice and theory 10 2 B.6, F.4
    Demonstrate clear thinking and deliver the outcome 10 4 D.1, E.1
    Apply technical style 10 5 E.1
    Completeness of Information 10 2, 3, 6 E.1
    Group work towards common goal 10 2 E.2
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 4: Final Examination
    Intent:
    Validation of learning on the fundamental concepts, problem solving skills, analysis and design procedures in Soil Mechanics and their application in real life. Assessing student's abilities to develop the required objectives of the subject and gain Soil Mechanics knowledge.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    A.1, B.1, B.2, C.3, D.1 and E.1
    Weight: 60%
    Criteria:
    Typical duration for feedback: 2 weeks
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Application of theory and methodology 20 1, 4 A.1, B.1
    Functionality of design 10 3 B.2
    Validity of justification for the design 10 5 C.3
    Application of analysis 10 5 A.1
    Judgement application within the limited time 10 5 B.1, D.1
    Identify the problem and Justification of solution 15 1, 2 D.1, E.1
    Correctness of decision making within the limited time 10 1 C.3, D.1
    Correctness of system modelling 10 2, 6 B.2
    Appropriateness of recommendations 5 6 B.2, E.1
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Assessment task 5: Research Project
    Intent:
    Engaging with research and encouraging to be research oriented and life long learners.
    Objective(s):
    This assessment task addresses subject learning objectives:
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6
    This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:
    B.2, B.5, B.6, D.1, D.2, E.3 and F.2
    Weight: 5%
    Criteria linkages:
    Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
    Correctness of format of the referencing 10 2 F.2
    Credibility and relevance of the source 10 4 B.6, D.2, E.3
    Ability to express key ideas within the limited space 5 1, 3 B.2, D.1
    Completeness of information; and quality & clarity of expression 20 1, 6 B.2
    Quality of structure 10 2, 4 E.3
    Appropriateness of design solution in relation to the context 20 5 B.5
    Balanced & effective use of text, diagrams & case studies 10 2 B.6
    Quality of Results and conclusions 15 4, 6 B.6
    SLOs: subject learning objectives
    CILOs: course intended learning outcomes
    Minimum requirements
    In order to pass the subject, students must receive 40% or more in the final examination and receive an overall total of 50% marks or more for the subject.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.